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#TWenty: The 2018 TomasinoWeb Year-end special

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Art by Jessica Lopez
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As the year draws to an end, we can’t help but think that this year is the worst—we say the same thing every year. But we really can’t blame ourselves because the Government really did us dirty; prices of our daily goods rose uncontrollably all thanks to the implementation of TRAIN law which made the poor even poorer, Martial Law in Mindanao is extended until the end of 2019 to “quell” the hostile activities there, and despite the rising death toll on the “War Against Drugs, the unjustified killings still continues.

Change has really happened to us, and it came down to us, really hardBut somehow, the sun shone on us. 

Our Growling Tigers’ renewed strength under the guidance of its new Coach Aldin Ayo and its Super Rookie Cj Cansino, revived the fighting spirit of the whole community.  And as the fight for our pride rekindles to a brighter flame, our fight for justice burns stronger as the 10 Aegis Juris frat men face charges against fatal hazing of Horacio and the former first lady Imelda Marcos is now convicted with seven counts of graft.

Yet, our country still faces the wrath of the Government as our the media faced the endless tirades where even their freedom is being suppressed by those in power. But strangely, the benevolence of our beloved system seems to be felt by the recently acquitted former senator Ramon “Bong” Revilla.

We were all begging for our plot twists to happen ever since 2017, but 2018 is the year that taught us that we don’t plead for change–we make it, because we’re tired of asking them to do so. And so, everyone in TomasinoWeb prepared for you #TWenty to look back to the times we have fallen, but most importantly, to the times we rose stronger than ever.

And we will continue to rise again—until lambs become lions.

Keep the fire burning,

Cielo Erikah Mae J. Cinco
Executive Editor

 

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Basketball

Defending champs Lady Bulldogs too much for Growling Tigresses

The UST Growling Tigresses were swept by the defending champions the NU Lady Bulldogs in Game 2 of UAAP women’s basketball tournament, 66-54, at the Mall of Asia Arena in Pasay Saturday, Nov. 23.

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Photo by Ann Corrine Vizconde/TomasinoWeb

The UST Growling Tigresses were swept by the defending champions the NU Lady Bulldogs in Game 2 of UAAP women’s basketball tournament, 66-54, at the Mall of Asia Arena in Pasay Saturday, Nov. 23.

The Tigresses hoped to live another day as they battled against the defending champions but failed as the Lady Bulldogs started the game strong and never looked back. 

UST was able to inch as close as 10 points in the payoff period before the Lady Bulldogs replied with an 18-4 run that immediately brought the lead out of reach in the final minutes.

Reynalyn Ferrer and MVP Grace Irebu were the key players for UST during the game as they had 16 and 11 points respectively.

On the other hand, NU continued its six-peat with three of their players scoring double digits in Monique del Carmen and Kaye Pingol who had 15 points apiece and Rhema Itesi with 12.

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Basketball

Chabi Yo, Nonoy bag MVP and Rookie of the Year honors

Growling Tiger forward Soulemane Chabi Yo was crowned as the season MVP while point guard Mark Nonoy claimed rookie of the year honors in the UAAP season 82 men’s basketball tournament on Wednesday, Nov. 6.

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Photo by Corinne Vizconde/TomasinoWeb

Growling Tiger forward Soulemane Chabi Yo was crowned as the season MVP while point guard Mark Nonoy claimed rookie of the year honors in the UAAP season 82 men’s basketball tournament on Wednesday, Nov. 6. 

Both players were instrumental in snapping UST’s three-year Final Four drought, with Chabi Yo serving as a two-way threat all throughout the season and Nonoy being the chief orchestrator of the team’s league-best offense.

Chabi Yo notched 76 statistical points to finish first in the MVP voting with his averages of 16.9 points, 14.7 rebounds and 1.3 assists, completely outclassing co-import Angelo Kouame, who himself was also among the favorites to claim the individual plum. 

Nonoy on the other hand, had 39.29 statistical points to go along with his season averages of 10.0 points, 3.8 rebounds and 2.3 dimes to edge out fellow frontrunners in teammate Sherwin Concepcion and the streaky Tamaraw guard LJay Gonzales. 

 

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Blogs

Revisiting Galleries and Museums

The country has numerous museums welcoming visitors. For Thomasians, these are only some that are nearby and very accessible. Let’s get ready to discover galleries and the astounding visuals they have to offer. 

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Artwork by Aldrich Aquino

Do you remember the rush of excitement in marching towards the museum and happily lining up in the entrance to see what it looks like inside? The memories might be fleeting but the feeling remains. After all these years, museums still invoke curiosity and wonder.

Every month of October, we are encouraged to revisit the museums all around the country. This month celebrates the Museums and Galleries and is intended to kindle national consciousness in the Filipino; promoting the nation’s rich and distinctive culture, heritage, and national identity embodied in the form of art and cultural, historical, and religious artifacts.

The country has numerous museums welcoming visitors. For Thomasians, these are only some that are nearby and very accessible. Let’s get ready to discover galleries and the astounding visuals they have to offer. 

National Museum of Natural History

museum-of-natural-history

Photo from Rappler

 

One of the most visited museums in the metro and also the largest museum in the Philippines, the National Museum of Natural History puffs its hint of modern architecture mixed with its rich heritage and collection of numerous artifacts.

Located at Teodoro F. Valencia Circle, Ermita, Manila. It opens it doors from 10:00AM to 5:00PM every Tuesday to Sunday. The newly reformed museum boasts a pristine atrium where the “The Tree of Life” rises in the center. Extending upwards, the skydome acts as a natural lightsource. It has now hosted numerous tourists and fellow Filipinos alike. Visitors can ogle on the beautifully designed halls and displays that consist of many artifacts and paintings.

Roaming around the alluring space of the museum, it would instantly make you realize that it is jam packed with literally everything—from marine life to biology to botany, the possibilities are endless. It shows the exquisiteness of our world, engaging us to become more interested in the life that exists around us.

National Museum of Fine Arts 

Photo from National Museum

Amidst the busy streets of Manila, peace can be found at the National Museum of Fine Arts located at Padre Burgos Drive, Manila. It opens at 10:00AM to 5:00PM from Tuesday to Sunday. One of the most famous paintings in the country’s history is displayed in the first floor lobby—Juan Luna’s Spoliarium. The enormous piece could be found hanging on a wide wall, being admired by anyone who enters.

Aside from the Spoliarium, the museum also showcases the works of famous painters such as Felix Resurreccion Hidalgo and Fernando Amorsolo. Aspiring artists, art lovers, or just casual viewers of art will find this museum a safe haven.

Ayala Museum

ayala-museum

Photo from Ayala Museum

Located in the city of business and industry, the Ayala Museum can be found at Makati Ave. cor. Dela Rosa St., Makati City and opens during 9:00AM to 6:00PM from Tuesday to Sunday.

The museum boasts as a major destination for school field trips, showcasing the country’s history from prehistoric times until the EDSA Revolution in 1986. The museum keeps a large number of rare artifacts that aren’t found elsewhere in the Philippines. The display of Philippine History enraptures its visitors—especially the Maritime Vessels Collection that pays tribute to a variety of ancient ships. A collection of pre-Hispanic items are worth looking at as well.

The museum also holds a lot of exhibitions, talks, workshops and even concerts which strengthens the museum’s goal in uplifting the Philippine arts, history, and culture scene vibrant.

Intramuros’ Museums and Galleries

 

Aside from the beauty that Intramuros radiates because of its history, there is more to it than just aesthetics. Its sites and museums houses the pieces and artworks that are part of the walled city’s rich past. 

You can start a museum hopping adventure around the area by starting from the Intramuros and Rizal Bagumbayan Light and Sound Museum which uses images, sounds, and animatronics to tell the history of the Philippines when it was colonized by Spain. 

Following that is Casa Manila Museum which also depicts the Spanish colonial lifestyle and how it influenced the Filipinos back then. The San Agustin Church is a UNESCO Heritage Site and its museum takes pride as well on its religious relics, wooden and ivory statues, the church’s 3500-kilogram bell, and many more. 

san-agustin-museum

Inside the San Agustin Church Museum. Photo from San Agustin Museum Facebook page

Depicting the lives of the largest number of immigrants in our country, the Bahay Tsinoy tells the struggles of the Chinese people, how they established Binondo, and how they connected with the Filipinos despite our differences. 

RIzal Shrine inside Fort Santiago, Intramuros. Photo from nhcp.gov.ph

Last on the list is the two-storey building Rizal Shrine Museum located in Fort Santiago where the Filipinos and Americans were imprisoned including our country’s national hero Jose Rizal. It stores Rizal’s archives and personal valuables such as books, clothing, medical instruments, and other things. 

Inside Museo de Intramuros. Photo from The Philippine Star.

You can also explore and see for yourself the other museums such as the NCCA Gallery, Museo de Intramuros, iMake History Fortress, Destileria  Limtuaco Museum, Instituto Cervantes de Manila, and Fr. George J. Willman SJ Museum. 

León Gallery

Situated in W14 La Fuerza Plaza, 2241 Chino Roces Avenue, Makati City, the León Gallery is the steward of Philippine antiques, Old Master Paintings by Juan Luna and Fernando Amorsolo to modernist modernist works by Fernando Zobel and Diosdado Lorenzo, and and other historical pieces of Filipino art. 

Photo from Rappler

The gallery also hosts exhibitions which features and commemorates the works of contemporary artists as well as antique furniture, ivory, and paintings. They also conduct biddings and auctions on antique furniture and paintings. The gallery definitely exceeds its mission on providing convenient access to contemporary and historical pieces of Filipino art.

UST Museum of Arts and Sciences

In the heart of the campus, is our very own museum that is a place to behold. Our museum has a wide collection of mineral, botanical, and biological artifacts that came from the science courses—more than 400 years ago when the university was beginning. Along with being the oldest university in the Philippines, UST also holds the oldest known museum in the country. The museum opens at 9:00AM to 2:30PM on Sunday and Monday, while it opens at 8:30AM to 5:30PM from Tuesday to Saturday.

Photo from UST Museum Facebook page

Cultural and historical pieces are the prevalent displays in the museum. It has old instruments, clothing, weaponry, and burial jars from different eras from the Philippines, China and Japan. Exuding the university’s pontifical status, the chair that Popes John Paul II and Francis sat on when they visited the country is showcased at the second floor.

The university definitely ignites and strengthens the sciences, Philippine culture and history together with religious artifacts in its museum.

The month of October is not the only time for you to visit these museums, in fact, you can visit museums all year round. Now that art is made more accessible, these displays of Philippine culture can educate us about our identity. By seeing these in our museums—we become far more stimulated to understand their interpretations in the past. 

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