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A taste of Malaysia: The Search for the Ideal Education Personalities 2012

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     COLLEGE of Education students Lois Juanillo and Kevin Bryan Tan were crowned as this year’s Ideal Education Personalities last November 20. However, it’s not the title that caught the two winners and everyone in awe; it’s the prestigious prizes that no one would ever think could be given in an ordinary campus pageant.

     The pageant was sponsored by the Embassy of Malaysia, which awarded the winners with a 4-day trip to Malaysia and entitled them as the Philippines’ student-ambassadors to Malaysia. This requires them to blog about their experience during their stay in the country.

     The contestants were totally clueless with the awards that await them if they win the pageant. Even though Malaysia was the theme of the pageant, they never expected that the prize will go as far as sending them to another country.

     “Throughout the pageant we’ve been talking anything about Malaysia,” Kevin Tan, a food technology student, said. “[The thing that excites me the most with Malaysia] is their cuisine.”

     On the other hand, Lois Juanillo, who is majoring in pre-school education, hopes to encounter a lot of new things in Malaysia.

     “I believe that it would be super fun and I also expect to learn more about Malaysia,” said Juanillo.

     The candidates were glamorously adorned by their theme wear as they walk on stage while carrying or representing a wau, the local kites of Malaysia. They also showed off their style with their casual wear and evening wear.

     Lois Juanillo grabbed both Best in Casual Wear and Best Evening Wear. Tan, on the other hand, won Best in Uniform.

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     Intermission numbers were performed after every segments of the program. Jerica Jalasco performed with the song ‘When I Look at You.’ Noah Anorico, a Thomasian Idol 2012 finalist, and Rae Anne Cajipe sang ‘Forever’ before the awarding of the special awards, while the Rythmyx Dance Troupe gave a sensual dance number.

     “Being an Ideal Education Personality means the reward to all my effort and work for the pageant. It’s not the title that I’m looking at but the honor that was given to me, because by being crowned as TSIEP, I really felt that I have a worth as an individual,” Juanillo said when asked what it means for her win the crown.

     UST’s Ideal Personality 2011 second runner-up and Pinoy Big Brother Teen Edition 4 housemate, Alec Brandon Dungo, and UST’s Ideal Personality 2012 first runner-up, Divine Grace De Castro, were among the judges during the coronation night. Also part of the board was Malaysian embassy First Secretary Raveendran Nair.

     Meanwhile, Philip Sinlao and Theresa Angeles were named second runner-up, while Jade Cuambot and Paula Matias bagged the first-runner up titles.

By Matthew Bernie D. Zate
Photo taken by Alvin John R. Torno

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Thomasian scientists on the painstaking process of validating new COVID-19 test kits

“When I accepted this clinical validation, I realized that, as a scientist, I have been living in a bubble. First, I expected that things would be a breeze but doing research in a pandemic is totally a different story,” Albano said.

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Team of researchers and faculty members from the College of Science — (From left to right) Asst. Prof. Nikki Heherson Dagamac, Dr. rer. nat., Prof. Pia Marie Albano, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. Maureen B. Sabit, Ph.D., and Mr. Reuel Bennett, Dr. rer. nat.

Thomasian researchers are on the brink of validating a cheaper and faster PCR (Polymerase Chain Reaction)-based detection of the COVID-19 virus.

The cost of a PCR-testing can be marked down once enough research has shown that this kit can successfully track the presence of COVID-19. This can eliminate the need for trained swabbers and enable the patients to swab themselves. Self-collection will expedite the process, reduce the spread of infection, and lessen labor.

As if the science behind it was not meticulous enough, the execution did not come easy either.

Singaporean Biotech company MiRXes Pte commissioned lead proponent Prof. Pia Marie Albano, Ph.D. to provide clinical validation of the company’s qPCR (quantitative Polymerase Chain Reaction) kit for the detection of SARS-CoV-2 via nasopharyngeal and saliva samples. Her team was composed of Mr. Reuel Bennett, Dr. rer. nat., Asst. Prof. Nikki Heherson Dagamac, Dr. rer. nat., and Asst. Prof. Maureen Sabit, Ph.D. from the Department of Biological Sciences. 

“When I accepted this clinical validation, I realized that, as a scientist, I have been living in a bubble. First, I expected that things would be a breeze but doing research in a pandemic is totally a different story. I encountered several challenges that I did not encounter pre-pandemic,” Albano said in the 2nd Science and Technology (STS) Summit.

During the 2nd STS Summit on Nov. 12, Albano outlined the key challenges the team had to hurdle through, namely ethical approval, study site, participant recruitment, team safety, and molecular analyses. 

The surge of Delta cases nearly ruined everything

In May 2021, the team chose Ilocos Norte, 512 kilometers from the city of Manila, to serve as their study site. Ilocos Norte seemed like the perfect place to get their samples processed. The facilities needed to successfully conduct the validation and the endemic situation of coronavirus cases were kept at bay.

“When we were about to send the equipment and materials to the study site, our research partners in the area could no longer commit because COVID-19 cases [had] started to dramatically increase after detecting Delta,” Albano said. 

While waiting to get cleared by the ethics committee, she noticed the spike of COVID cases in the locale and began to draft contingency plans. Thanks to their proactivity,  the team was able to subcontract Singapore Diagnostics (SGD) which is a private DOH-accredited COVID-19 molecular testing facility in Makati. They figured that, with the sticky situation, it might not be “wise” to partner with a government-run hospital at the time.

“At this point, there was no turning back. I am accountable and I was committed to successfully implement the trial despite all the odds,” Albano said.

They set foot – rather by boat, in the province of Candaba, Pampanga as their new and final study site. The new study site exposed the team to language barriers and boisterous weather conditions. Their kick-off was pushed months later on Aug. 6.

During its early stages, the team’s first batch of swabbers and drivers had tested positive and resigned after their quarantine. Luckily, the team had been training additional swabbers and drivers in high-risk areas, and strictly imposed biosafety guidelines and testing every week. This smooth transition meant that the trial could go unhindered despite the setbacks faced.

COVID-19 stigma among participants

Participant recruitment for the validation of cheaper and faster COVID-19 PCR-based test kits. Screengrab from the 2nd Science and Technology Summit

“A positive result was equated to loss of income,” she said as she described how the stigma of getting a positive result affected families. 

Many potential participants hesitated due to the stigma associated with positive cases. Positive COVID results meant that breadwinners could not provide for their families; they could starve while waiting in quarantine. 

This spurred Albano to give sacks of rice rather than the initially planned monetary compensation. 

Political and administrative power dynamics

“In the past, I would only need to present to the medical director and department heads of hospitals whenever I would invite for collaboration. However, in this clinical trial, this clinical trial taught me the importance of understanding the local power dynamics in order to access potential participants,” she said.

According to Albano, access to areas with high COVID-19 cases, quarantine facilities, and community-based testing sites were the hardest. 

“I had to ask the support of medical technologists to have access to their COVID-19 testing facilities. I approached factory workers and factory owners to have their members and employees tested for free. I also invited healthcare workers, especially the volunteers in vaccination sites. And of course, I invited the UST community to participate,” she said. 

Regulations at the local level are dependent on the current COVID situation. Some places have implemented local lockdowns based on where the cases are. The strategy became focused on a constant dialogue with community members and different organizations within communities. It resulted in genuine collaboration between stakeholders in all aspects of the clinical trial. 

“Principal investigators of COVID-19 clinical trials should possess flexibility because the pandemic presents unforeseen changes and diversity of situations one should be able to adjust to constraints and to make fast decisions and plans during ambiguous situations,” she said.

Conducting clinical trials during a pandemic is no easy feat. Albano’s team learned that through the various obstacles that they faced. From the study site to the lack of participants, team safety, and the various political and administrative hurdles, they broke through to the other side to tell the tale.

Despite the odds, the team was still able to pull-off figures beyond the required 300 positive and 500 negative cases for testing. The results will then be sent to MiRXes for further validation and application by the FDA in Singapore. 

Christine Nicole Montojo
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Angela Gabrielle Magbitang Atejera
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UST creative writing major Aleia Anies’ shot in the dark

After submitting the revised version of her piece about siblings tackling grief and mental health issues for her playwriting subject, Anies didn’t hope for anything let alone be accepted.

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Photo courtesy of Ellie Bun

UST AB Creative Writing student, Aleia Marie Anies will be joining the three-week Virgin Labfest 16 Writing Fellowship Program starting Nov. 16 until Dec. 5. 

In an interview with TomasinoWeb, Anies shared her excitement from being one of the eight fellows for this year’s CCP’s Virgin Labfest Fellowship (VLF) Program. 

Being the first Creative Writing undergraduate from the University to attend the event, Anies couldn’t help but feel ecstatic. “Actually, hindi pa nagsisink in, as in ang surreal,” she said.

Although she initially considered dropping out, there were questions that lingered around her. “Kasi alam mo ‘yung feeling na pumapasok na, ‘What if hanggang dito na lang ako?’ ‘What if hindi ko na kayang gumawa pa or magsulat pa ng mas maganda?’ ‘What if hindi ako mag-improve as a writer?’” 

But for the creative writing major, the mere fact that she was chosen and given this opportunity was enough reason for her to keep going. It was the sign that she was waiting for.

Anies also shared that her submission for the VLF was “a shot in the dark.” After submitting the revised version of her piece about siblings tackling grief and mental health issues for her playwriting subject, she didn’t hope for anything let alone be accepted.

When asked about what motivates her to write, the 36th Gawad Ustetika winner for Fiction used soap suds and sponges as metaphors for writing.

“Writers are like sponges, we have to be able to absorb the things around us at ang gamit natin ay ‘yung senses natin. I think soap suds are the perfect analogy for our regurgitating words […] Kasi kailangan mo talagang pigain yung sarili mo as a writer before ka makaproduce ng soap, before ka makaproduce ng work or literature,” she said.

Originality comes second for the writer as she emphasized the need for a writer to be able to squeeze themselves and create a good piece. “I think a good piece of literature comes from a writer who can squeeze themselves, ‘yung kayang dikdikin ‘yung sarili nila and someone who is always willing to absorb new information, always willing to learn, to learn from themselves, but also, to learn from others.” 

For three weeks of exchanging insights and establishing a bond, Anies is excited about what will happen, “I’m looking forward to learning from other people, I’m looking forward to watching a lot more plays and sobrang excited ako sa workshop kasi nga diba […] gusto kong pigain pa ako, gusto kong mapiga pa para mareach ko ‘yung full potential ko.” 

The Virgin Labfest Fellowship Writing Program is an annual event of the Cultural Center of the Philippines that focuses on training young aspiring playwrights through lectures, discussions, and workshops. This year, Glenn Sevilla Mas, the multi-award-winning playwright, will be mentoring the fellows. 

Aliah Basbas
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Tale of struggle: Music alumnus shares thyroid cancer journey

“You will always find answers to everything. Not until you die, it’s not yet a dead end,” Mendoza said.

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fonzy mendoza
Artwork by Wendell Adrian Quijado/TomasinoWeb

Fonzy Mendoza, 38, could not help but be nervous as he gripped on the results of his fine-needle aspiration biopsy after discovering a lump on his neck. With trembling hands, he opened the envelope to find the words “Suspicious For Papillary Carcinoma” written in bold on the front.

Mendoza, a music alumnus from the University of Santo Tomas, prides himself as a healthy person. Despite not being a health buff, he never smoked and always ate healthily. But one day, he was diagnosed with thyroid cancer, taking his life in a different route.

“I was really stunned and for a temporary time, I’m really unable to react […] Hindi ako makapaniwala totoo ba to? Is this really happening to me? Marami-raming tao nung time na yun pero wala akong marinig na ingay […] I felt numb,” Mendoza told TomasinoWeb

Once he told his parents about his diagnosis, Mendoza came up with an action plan. He didn’t go through the in-denial stage as he immediately learned which doctors to meet and what treatments would possibly be done to him. 

“I was also afraid to lose my life. When I say life, life in general, life per se, passion gives me life. Like singing is my passion. There [was] a possibility that I could lose my voice too,” he said. 

There was no other way aside from getting surgery, so he met with a number of doctors who would take care of both his life and his passion.

“Alamin mo yung ino-operahan nila na [thyroid cancer patients] in a year because you need to know their expertise at ilan ang successful rate. […] If they will fit not only to operate me but in a way that I could still live the way it was,” he said. 

After a tedious search, Mendoza found Dr. Gerard Agcaoili, a doctor in Medical City who he believed to be the most fitting doctor to operate on him.

“[Dr. Agcaoili] will also take care of my life and my voice because he’s a doctor of singers, so he knows my aim,” he said. 

Being ‘strong’

“Because people see me as a strong person, […] feeling nila I can do everything on my own so yung expectation ng tao, kaya ko,” Mendoza said as he remembered the struggles of realizing that his diagnosis somehow altered his relationship with the people around him. According to him, being “strong” does not seem to fit with him when he was battling cancer, but people would still see him as such. 

There was not enough support as his parents couldn’t fly to the Philippines, and he only had his best friend and ex-partner with him. Although he had friends checking up on him from time to time, Mendoza said it felt different.

“Iba ‘yung nandoon sa tabi mo eh. I wasn’t getting that [support] kasi nga ang taas taas ng tingin nila sakin,” he said. “I hate it that people look at me so strong. I hate that people look at me as [if] I can do everything. Because [during] that time, I want to feel loved. I want to feel embraced. I want to feel that I’m weak.”

The lack of support Mendoza got was the reason he felt that he did not have enough strength even though his doctor said they were ready to operate on him. But when he prayed before getting inside the operating room, he felt a different kind of love. It was a sudden feeling of ease, and that made him feel ready.

“Kaya sabi ko noon faith has revived me kasi it makes me feel that I will be okay, that I’ll live my life after this operation, [and that] I can do things with a purpose,” he said. 

Words of affirmation

Mendoza understood that people’s words of affirmation were their way of supporting him through his cancer journey, but there were instances when it didn’t feel like it.

“People and some doctors will always say [thyroid cancer] is good cancer, but how can it be good if it’s cancer?” he said after some people told him that his cancer was “curable compared to others.”

But what those people failed to understand was his cancer had already altered the physical and emotional effects he would go through. Someone even assured him that taking levothyroxine, a synthetic version of a thyroid hormone used to treat thyroid hormone deficiency, would help him feel better.

“[Thyroid cancer] changes the phasing of my life. When we say life, it’s how you live it. Kung ano yung proseso kung pano ka mabuhay, na-alter ‘yun and how can I be okay if I cannot be the same?”

Another thing that Mendoza didn’t want was people who would look at him as if he would die. He felt that with some of his friends who told him they “needed” to go out when they found out about his ordeal. 

“Lumabas tayo in a way because we want to celebrate life [and] not because as if that’s my last day,” he said. He wants people to know that it’s not okay for a cancer patient to hear these kinds of words.

“Kahit sinong may sakit na tao, ‘wag mo iparamdam na last day na nila […] because once you lose hope, they will lose hope.”

Surviving ThyCa

It usually takes five years to know that a person is already cancer-free or is already in remission. In Mendoza’s case, it’s been two years since his test showed that the cancer was undetectable. 

“Even though I’m not yet in [full] remission, […] I can say that I’m really a survivor,” he said. 

Mendoza plans to launch a non-profitable organization called “Be Your Own HERO” where people with different types of cancer uplift each other through sessions. 

“[Ang] cancer patient, ang kailangan niyan moral suport eh aside from financial […] Sa pamilya minsan kulang, kailangan manggaling yun sa mga tao na nakaka-experience noon mismo […] ‘yung on-hand experience minsan mas tangible sa tao,” he said. 

Mendoza said battling cancer could be paralyzing emotionally, physically, and mentally but he told people never to lose hope.

“You will always find answers to everything. Not until you die, it’s not yet a dead end,” Mendoza said.

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