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Former CSC PRO is new prexy; executive board back to full slate

Political Science junior and former Central Student Council Public Relations Officer Francis Gabriel Santos was proclaimed president with 13,351 votes.

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kiko santos
Photo by Alec Go/TomasinoWeb.

Former Central Student Council (CSC) Public Relations Officer (PRO) Francis Gabriel Santos is set to lead as the new president of the CSC following the proclamation of the new set of CSC executive board officers last Saturday.

The Political Science junior won the highest post with 13,351 votes, defeating Civil Law sophomore and former CSC Secretary Karizza Kamille Cruz, who garnered 9,414 votes. A total of 3,383 students left the ballots unanswered.

Along with Santos, the Central Commission on Elections (Comelec) also proclaimed the winning candidates for the positions of vice president, secretary, treasurer, auditor and PRO — marking the board’s return to a full slate after abstentions in last year’s polls left four posts vacant for the entire year.

Biochemistry junior and lone candidate Victor Amores was proclaimed vice president with 15,241 votes, while a total of 10,907 ballots were left unanswered.

Medicine freshman Robert Dominic Gonzales was elected secretary with 9,818 votes, besting Journalism junior Carol Anne Balita who obtained 9,156 votes. A total of 7,174 students left the ballots unanswered.

Marketing Management junior Alek Pierce Joell Santa Ana,  who ran unopposed following the disqualification of Graduate School student Rome Voltaire Gomez, was proclaimed treasurer with 14,759 votes, while a total of 11,389 ballots left unanswered (READ: Comelec disqualifies treasurer bet).

Medical Technology junior and lone candidate Adrian Lee Fernando was elected auditor, winning 14,587 votes, while a total of 11,561 ballots were left unanswered.

Advertising Arts junior Jeanne Nicole Naval was proclaimed PRO, obtaining 7,649 votes, beating Political Science juniors Jan Krianne Pineda and Jeremiah Pasion, who garnered 6,645 and 6,273 votes, respectively. A total of 5,581 ballots were left unanswered.

All candidates for this year’s CSC elections ran independently, as sole accredited political party Lakas ng Diwang Tomasino did not field any bets for the polls (READ: Lakasdiwa fields no candidates for CSC polls as independent bets fill candidate list).

The Central Comelec removed “abstain” votes in the electronic ballots used this year following a resolution by the Central Judiciary Board regarding the abstentions in last year’s polls. Voters, however, could leave their ballots unanswered (READ: No ‘abstain’ in upcoming CSC elections; students develop new electronic voting system).

A total of 26,148 out of 38,045 students participated in this year’s University-wide elections, higher than last year’s 28,873 out of 43,762.

 

Continuing platforms, plans

In an interview with TomasinoWeb, president-elect Santos said he would continue what he has started and learned as CSC PRO.

“[P]apatawag tayo ng unang meeting with the new set of executive board officers so as to set the direction of the CSC next academic year,” Santos said.

He also said they would begin actualizing the Students’ Rights and Welfare (Straw) Coalition platform and the other platforms of the executive board officers.

“For my case, uunahin natin ‘yung pagtatag ng Straw Coalition dito sa University, that will be the first step. Para by August or by September ma-launch natin siya dito and ma-set na ‘yung general direction ng coalition para, at the end of it all, ma-produce ‘yung batas, congress or ‘yung Student’s code dito sa University, he added.  

Next year’s CSC Central Board, composed of the newly-elected local student council presidents, are as follows: Rafael Enrico Arellano (Faculty of Arts and Letters), Maria Dascha Uy (College of Architecture), Jealar Lazaga (Alfredo M. Velayo – College of Accountancy), Carl Joseph Reyes (College of Commerce and Business Administration), John Louis Torres (College of Tourism and Hospitality Management), Nikki Mei Ko (Faculty of Civil Law), Maricris Chuang (College of Education), Kristienne Mary Magsanoc (Education High School), Catherine Rose Santa Romana (Faculty of Engineering), Jheanna Delleopac (Junior High School) , Marianne Therese Lacap (Institute of Information and Computing Sciences), Lance Estenar (Faculty of Medicine and Surgery), Mikaela Janelle Mallorca (College of Nursing), Carlo Miguel Sarrosa (Faculty of Pharmacy), John Alfred Ravena (Faculty of Philosophy), Vashwin Amarnani (College of Science), Maria Taña Sanchez (Senior High School), Bro. Sandy Alerta, O.P. (Faculty of Sacred Theology), Bryan Joshua Casao (Institute of Physical Education and Athletics).

Candidates for the Conservatory of Music Student Council were disqualified and is yet to announce a schedule for elections.

Local elections for the College of Fine Arts and Design, College of Rehabilitation Sciences and the Faculty of Canon Law are currently being conducted and is set to end on Friday, April 27. —M.W. dela Paz, with reports from P. Jamilla and A. Ortega

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Thomasians promote youth engagement in nat’l affairs

Several Thomasians from different youth organizations pushed for the inclusion of youth participation in shaping the country in an online protest on Thursday, Jan. 21. 

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Online youth protest, "“Sulong Tomasino!: First Day Fight!” streamed via League of Filipino Students-UST official Facebook page on Thursday, Jan. 21.

Several Thomasians from different youth organizations pushed for the inclusion of youth participation in shaping the country in an online protest on Thursday, Jan. 21. 

Rights for Education representative Jay Santos stressed that the academe should also join the youth in this agenda. 

“[S]a panahon natin ngayon at  sa kasaysayan pa ng ating bansa, kinikilala natin ang kahalagahan ng papel ng kabataan sa paglahok at pahubog ng ating lipunan, at dapat katuwang natin dito ang ating paaralan,” she said.

According to Santos, the continuous suppression of the academe towards students also mirrors the government’s way of silencing its critics. 

Meanwhile, journalism major and one of the petitioners of the controversial Anti-Terror Law Mark Geronimo, encouraged the youth to use different social media platforms to educate and criticize the government. 

“[Y]ung mga platforms katulad ng Twitter, Facebook gamitin natin ito para mag educate at mag criticize sa mga maling gawain ng gobyerno,” Geronimo said.

Despite receiving several threats from online trolls, Geronimo still urged the youth to educate themselves in the current issues faced by the country. 

The online protest titled “Sulong Tomasino!: First Day Fight!” was streamed last Jan. 21 at the official Facebook page of League of Filipino Students – UST.

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SHS student barred from enrollment; admin cites code of conduct violation as basis

According to LFS–UST, Senior High School (SHS) Student Council Head Councilor Shoti Ampatuan was given a show cause notice due to his affiliation with Anakbayan–UST SHS, which resulted in his dismissal from his position and denial of his good moral certification.

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Photo by Rohm Bautista/TomasinoWeb

The University barred a student officer from enrolling next academic term after allegedly violating the Student’s Code of Conduct, the League of Filipino Students (LFS)–UST disclosed on Wednesday, Jan. 20.

According to LFS–UST, Senior High School (SHS) Student Council Head Councilor Shoti Ampatuan was given a show cause notice due to his affiliation with Anakbayan–UST SHS, which resulted in his dismissal from his position and denial of his good moral certification.

Ampatuan told TomasinoWeb that the alleged violation pertains to PPS 1027 of the Code of Conduct, which states that “students shall join only organizations duly recognized by the University.”

In his response to the show cause notice released last year Nov. 17, Ampatuan clarified that the evidence used against him was for the movement calling for academic ease in light of the three typhoons that hit the country between Oct. 25 to Nov. 12.

“I would like to clarify that I did not intend to deliberately violate the Code of Conduct of the University. As such, I apologize for any misunderstanding that my post may have caused,” he said.

He also defended his affiliation with Anakbayan, saying that it helped him be fully educated on social issues, and provided him an avenue to speak up against injustice and equality which, according to him, is among the many things the University has taught him.

“I believe that we are in a critical time in our nation’s history, and that due to this, the youth should be given the opportunity to further amplify their voices,” Ampatuan said.

LFS-UST urged the university administration to reverse its decision, firmly stressing that universities “should be an avenue for free speech, and not repression.”

“We call on the admin to overturn their decision and to uphold students’ democratic rights and be one with their students in their fight for quality education, human rights, and accountability for the Duterte regime’s criminal negligence,” the organization said.

‘A form of hypocrisy’

In a statement posted Thursday, Anakbayan-UST SHS described the said rule as “a form of hypocrisy” and questioned the administration’s actions.

“They utterly stated that the student violated the Code of Conduct due to their membership to a mass organization while hundreds of students […] are members of NGOs. Why pinpoint this student and this student only?” Anakbayan-UST asked.

“Why not instead of silencing and filing these resolutions because of the studentry [sic] wanting to be vocal, listen to what they say,” the organization added.

This is not the first time the University prohibited a student activist from SHS from enrolling and receiving good moral certification.

In February 2018, a group of SHS students were denied good moral certificates after staging a silent protest inside the Buenaventura Garcia Paredes, O.P. (BGPOP) building over the implementation of the K-12 program and the e-books system.

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Faculty of Medicine remembers professor Lorenzo Magat, 60

The UST – Faculty of Medicine and Surgery (FMS) expressed their grief over the passing of Dr. Lorenzo Magat in an online eulogy on Thursday, Jan. 7. 

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Dr. Lorenzo "Chito" Magat (Photo from UST Faculty of Medicine and Surgery website)

The UST – Faculty of Medicine and Surgery (FMS) expressed their grief over the passing of Dr. Lorenzo Magat in an online eulogy on Thursday, Jan. 7. 

Magat died last Dec. 30 at the age of 60. He is an alumna of the University and a professor at the UST-FMS, where he taught microbiology and clinical pathology. 

Former adviser to the National Task Force for COVID-19 and UST alumna Dr. Tony Leachon described him as a “silent yet caring” friend. 

“He was a good friend of many. Silent lang yung style niya,” Leachon said. 

Earlier on Jan. 2, Leachon also took to Facebook his sorrow over Magat’s death. 

“Today we gather to mourn as one, ensuring your memory will never be undone. In loving memory of the one we love and honor, may your brightness always shine down from above,”  Leachon said. 

One of Magat’s former students recalls him as a “kind and passionate professor,” someone who encouraged them to study and understand medicine in a deeper sense to become great doctors someday. 

Several colleagues also flocked online to extend their condolence and sympathy to Magat’s family.

“[H]e was our clinical pathology resident before. I [will] always remember his smile,” the post read. 

The community mass was streamed online in the UST-FMS official Facebook page last Jan. 7 followed by a novena and a eulogy.

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