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Former CSC PRO is new prexy; executive board back to full slate

Political Science junior and former Central Student Council Public Relations Officer Francis Gabriel Santos was proclaimed president with 13,351 votes.

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Photo by Alec Go/TomasinoWeb.

Former Central Student Council (CSC) Public Relations Officer (PRO) Francis Gabriel Santos is set to lead as the new president of the CSC following the proclamation of the new set of CSC executive board officers last Saturday.

The Political Science junior won the highest post with 13,351 votes, defeating Civil Law sophomore and former CSC Secretary Karizza Kamille Cruz, who garnered 9,414 votes. A total of 3,383 students left the ballots unanswered.

Along with Santos, the Central Commission on Elections (Comelec) also proclaimed the winning candidates for the positions of vice president, secretary, treasurer, auditor and PRO — marking the board’s return to a full slate after abstentions in last year’s polls left four posts vacant for the entire year.

Biochemistry junior and lone candidate Victor Amores was proclaimed vice president with 15,241 votes, while a total of 10,907 ballots were left unanswered.

Medicine freshman Robert Dominic Gonzales was elected secretary with 9,818 votes, besting Journalism junior Carol Anne Balita who obtained 9,156 votes. A total of 7,174 students left the ballots unanswered.

Marketing Management junior Alek Pierce Joell Santa Ana,  who ran unopposed following the disqualification of Graduate School student Rome Voltaire Gomez, was proclaimed treasurer with 14,759 votes, while a total of 11,389 ballots left unanswered (READ: Comelec disqualifies treasurer bet).

Medical Technology junior and lone candidate Adrian Lee Fernando was elected auditor, winning 14,587 votes, while a total of 11,561 ballots were left unanswered.

Advertising Arts junior Jeanne Nicole Naval was proclaimed PRO, obtaining 7,649 votes, beating Political Science juniors Jan Krianne Pineda and Jeremiah Pasion, who garnered 6,645 and 6,273 votes, respectively. A total of 5,581 ballots were left unanswered.

All candidates for this year’s CSC elections ran independently, as sole accredited political party Lakas ng Diwang Tomasino did not field any bets for the polls (READ: Lakasdiwa fields no candidates for CSC polls as independent bets fill candidate list).

The Central Comelec removed “abstain” votes in the electronic ballots used this year following a resolution by the Central Judiciary Board regarding the abstentions in last year’s polls. Voters, however, could leave their ballots unanswered (READ: No ‘abstain’ in upcoming CSC elections; students develop new electronic voting system).

A total of 26,148 out of 38,045 students participated in this year’s University-wide elections, higher than last year’s 28,873 out of 43,762.

 

Continuing platforms, plans

In an interview with TomasinoWeb, president-elect Santos said he would continue what he has started and learned as CSC PRO.

“[P]apatawag tayo ng unang meeting with the new set of executive board officers so as to set the direction of the CSC next academic year,” Santos said.

He also said they would begin actualizing the Students’ Rights and Welfare (Straw) Coalition platform and the other platforms of the executive board officers.

“For my case, uunahin natin ‘yung pagtatag ng Straw Coalition dito sa University, that will be the first step. Para by August or by September ma-launch natin siya dito and ma-set na ‘yung general direction ng coalition para, at the end of it all, ma-produce ‘yung batas, congress or ‘yung Student’s code dito sa University, he added.  

Next year’s CSC Central Board, composed of the newly-elected local student council presidents, are as follows: Rafael Enrico Arellano (Faculty of Arts and Letters), Maria Dascha Uy (College of Architecture), Jealar Lazaga (Alfredo M. Velayo – College of Accountancy), Carl Joseph Reyes (College of Commerce and Business Administration), John Louis Torres (College of Tourism and Hospitality Management), Nikki Mei Ko (Faculty of Civil Law), Maricris Chuang (College of Education), Kristienne Mary Magsanoc (Education High School), Catherine Rose Santa Romana (Faculty of Engineering), Jheanna Delleopac (Junior High School) , Marianne Therese Lacap (Institute of Information and Computing Sciences), Lance Estenar (Faculty of Medicine and Surgery), Mikaela Janelle Mallorca (College of Nursing), Carlo Miguel Sarrosa (Faculty of Pharmacy), John Alfred Ravena (Faculty of Philosophy), Vashwin Amarnani (College of Science), Maria Taña Sanchez (Senior High School), Bro. Sandy Alerta, O.P. (Faculty of Sacred Theology), Bryan Joshua Casao (Institute of Physical Education and Athletics).

Candidates for the Conservatory of Music Student Council were disqualified and is yet to announce a schedule for elections.

Local elections for the College of Fine Arts and Design, College of Rehabilitation Sciences and the Faculty of Canon Law are currently being conducted and is set to end on Friday, April 27. —M.W. dela Paz, with reports from P. Jamilla and A. Ortega

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Classes resume as NCR Plus shifts to MECQ

Classes remain to be delivered under Enriched Virtual Mode until the end of the academic year and subject to extension depending on the University’s decision.

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Photo Aliah Danseco/TomasinoWeb

The University announced the resumption of classes, both synchronous and asynchronous, starting Monday, April 12 after the national government reverted the ‘NCR Plus’ bubble back to Modified Enhanced Community Quarantine. 

Onsite work, however, will remain suspended according to the Office of Secretary-General. 

The University halted its classes last April 5 after both the UST Central Student Council and UST Faculty Union sought for a “health break.” 

“[W]e realized that the number of COVID-19 cases is not only increasing in number but is now turning into names of people who are very familiar and dear to us,” the Faculty Union petition stated.

Classes remain to be delivered under Enriched Virtual Mode until the end of the academic year and subject to extension depending on the University’s decision.

As of April 11, the Department of Health announced a total number of 864,868 with 146,519 active Covid-19 cases in the country. 

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UST Hiraya blasts Duterte’s attempt to grope maid, Roque’s defense

An advocacy-based organization in the University denounced President Rodrigo Duterte’s actions toward a female house helper during his birthday celebration on March 28, as well as Malacañang’s defense on the incident.

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Photo from UST Hiraya's statement posted on their official Facebook page last April 1.

An advocacy-based organization in the University denounced President Rodrigo Duterte’s actions toward a female house helper during his birthday celebration on March 28, as well as Malacañang’s defense on the incident.

In a now-viral video posted by Sen. Bong Go, Duterte was caught attempting to touch his house helper’s crotch area. Palace spokesperson Harry Roque, however, defended the president by saying that there was “no malice” to it since the woman is already used to Duterte’s humor. 

In a statement posted on April 1, UST Hiraya said that acts of harassment should not be normalized, as a woman’s dignity is “just as valuable as a man’s.”

“In a country in which the patriarchal culture has gotten the best of society’s prejudice and […] justice system, such acts shall not be condoned and normalized. A woman’s dignity is just as valuable as that of a man’s,” they said. 

UST Hiraya president Judy Borja explained that rape jokes and other forms of sexual harassment are normalized because of people who enable this kind of behavior. 

“[This is] because of people like Harry Roque who continue to make excuses for people who commit sexual harassment like Duterte. As long as there will be enablers, such acts are still ‘normal’ for some people,” she told TomasinoWeb

According to Borja, Duterte’s misconduct subjects women to more “heinous” acts by influencing “misguided” children and adults to continue doing such despite the existence of the Safe Spaces Act. 

Under the Safe Spaces Act or RA 11313, sexual harassers or those who commit unwanted sexual advances are penalized.

“They will feel like they are above the law and will less likely follow. Due to this, more and more women will be subjected to such heinous acts,” she said.

The organization also urged Thomasians and Filipinos to stand against rape and sexual harassment, and to help break the “boys will be boys” stereotype.

According to Borja, speaking up against harassment allows offenders to take accountability for their actions and stops victims from blaming themselves.

“Speaking up against sexual harassment lets one hold the perpetrator accountable for the wrongful act that they did because if they have the heart to listen and learn, they will learn from it…[A]lso, victim-survivors of sexual harassment will not longer feel alone nor blame themselves,” she said. 

Borja also highlighted the importance of putting trigger warnings when discussing topics like rape and sexual harassment, as these issues could affect some people’s mental health. 

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Pharma remembers ‘longest-serving’ prof, Jacinta Cruz

Assoc. Prof. Jacinta Cruz, MHPEd served as a mentor to generations of medical technologists from Faculty of Pharmacy. She was recognized as an “Outstanding Professional in Medical Technology” by the Professional Regulation Committee in 2009. 

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Late Assoc. Prof. Jacinta Cruz. Photo from UST official Facebook page.

The University mourned the loss of one of its longest-serving professors from the Faculty of Pharmacy (FoP) yesterday, March 26. 

Before her retirement, Assoc. Prof. Jacinta Cruz, MHPEd served as a mentor to generations of medical technologists from FoP. She was recognized as an “Outstanding Professional in Medical Technology” by the Professional Regulation Committee in 2009. 

The FoP also expressed their sympathy and gratitude to their departed colleague online. 

Mark Angelo Ngu, one of her former students, recalled how Cruz changed his life and how he discovered that he was diabetic through her laboratory experiment. 

He also said that she was a “strict” professor but for accountable reasons. 

“[S]he was strict, and she scolds students, but there is a reason for this one, in order for us to ready ourselves in the real world, [..] her philosophy was to hone our emotional stability as early in order to prepare us for the real world,” Ngu told TomasinoWeb.

Cruz, however, also never failed to show her “kwela” side to her students as well, which makes her unforgettable for Ngu. 

“[D]espite her strictness, she also has her “kwela” side. Once you get to know her “kwela” side, you will surely be happy with her around. Kaya hindi namin makalimutan si Ma’am Jannie,” he said.

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