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Putting awareness in actions: going green the Thomasian way

After inciting awareness on the status of our environment, Greener UST is now back on its second phase to solidify our environmental awareness into actions.

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Becoming environmentally conscious can be an arduous task for a single person working towards an ambitious goal. This challenging aspect of having an advocacy to promote was addressed by representatives of the Thomasian community last Monday and through their collaborative efforts, they forged a link together to put forth a long-term cause for the environment and for both the present and future Thomasians.

After inciting awareness on the status of the Philippine environment and receiving positive feedback during its first phase, Greener UST is back on its second phase and is now solidifying our environmental awareness into actions through The Green Congress: Project Pitching.

“Hinihintay talaga namin itong second phase for the project para ma-involve ‘yung mga students but we’re still implementing the movement sa mga projects and, so far, ‘yung biggest changes na nangyari is for this Agape and Paskuhan movement, ‘yung bagong committee, which is yung Waste Segregation Committee,” shared by UST Central Student Council (CSC) Auditor and Project Head of Greener UST, Adrian Lee Fernando, in an interview with TomasinoWeb.

Representatives from the Local Student Councils (LSC) and university-wide student organizations gathered last November 26 at the Tan Yan Kee (TYK) Auditorium to pitch for possible projects and environmental campaigns gearing towards a greener university life with long-term effect, “It’s one of the frustrations of Fr. Dexter,” Mr. Allan de Guzman, the Office Staff for Student Activities said, “…dapat hindi lang pang Paskuhan, dapat pang future.” Paskuhan, as one of the University’s biggest event, requires careful and detailed planning–starting from the overall decorations, logistics, pocket events, and of course, the much-awaited concert and firework display. However, the aftermath of the festivities is not as pleasant to the eyes compared to the glistening decor as overfilled trash bins improperly thrown wastes litter the University grounds and De Guzman was firm to remind the participants the need for environment-related agendas such as these, to not be short-lived hence, he also reiterated the importance of documentation in solidifying plans.

The usual seminars on environmental awareness and policies such as plastic-free, were expected by Fernando to be pitched during The Green Congress; however unexpected yet promising and innovative events fit for the Thomasian community were also convened and recommended, “[…] Hindi ko na-expect is yung environmental fair kasi sa tagal na ng stay ko sa UST, hindi pa tayo nagkakaroon ng gan’ong fair in support, sa mga projects”, he said.

Using Social media in promoting this environmental cause within the University was also the common denominator among the ideas of the participants, De Guzman and Fernando also encouraged this initiative because of its money-saving benefits as well as its maximizing effect inside the University. In the end, the plausible events were sifted from the pitched ideas of the LSCs and were then categorized into three: Policies, Strategies, and Projects await for the Thomasians.

Going environmental-friendly has been one of the goals of the University for almost ten years now when in 2008, a complete ban on the use of styrofoam made materials were implemented. Today, these renewed small plans of actions are becoming catalysts for change. Even with small steps, these efforts are becoming self-evident within the campus and Fernando was grateful that their continued efforts in achieving a greener University has been getting enthusiastic support from the students, faculty members, and even, people in the administration.

In reality, looking out for the environment is easier said than done but with the collective and synergistic efforts initiated by a group of individuals with a determined belief in the same cause, success is not far from the horizon. As Thomasians, we must always practice what we preach and put our awareness into actions in order to have progress. In putting forward an environmental cause, we must understand that the concept of praxis is very much needed in anticipating a greener and environmentally responsible University culture.

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Red-tagging ‘license to kill’ for law enforcers—solon

Kabataan Partylist Rep. Sarah Elago denounced the continuing red-tagging of activists and academic institutions, emphasizing it endangers the youth and others who are being subjected to the “deadly” practice.

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Kabataan Partylist Rep. Sarah Elago during the online discussion on campus press freedom yesterday, March 10.

Kabataan Partylist Rep. Sarah Elago denounced the continuing red-tagging of activists and academic institutions, emphasizing it endangers the youth and others who are being subjected to the “deadly” practice. 

“Hindi pwedeng trial by publicity, part of public opinion, o sa social media na hinuhusgahan ‘yung mga organizations [at] list of personalities dahil tila ‘yung red-tagging [ay] nagiging license to kill ng mga law enforcement and other rogue elements in our society,” Elago said in an online discussion with campus publications on Wednesday, March 10. 

Elago stressed that the recent tagging of 38 colleges and universities in the country as “recruitment havens” of the New People’s Army violates their right to due process, which deprives them of the chance to defend themselves.

“[R]ed-baiting discredits those who were being targeted, undermine the work they do, and sensationalizes lives […] just to scandalize critics, opposition, and all those who are reporting the trust,” she said. 

According to College Editors Guild of the Philippines National Secretariat Anton Narciso, red-tagging is one of the issues campus journalists continue to face, citing recent attacks on student publications in the University of the Philippines and in other regions. 

“Bagamat nakakatakot po talaga ang red-tagging, kinakailangan na collectively labanan […] dahil wala tayong ibang panghahawakan at wala tayong ibang sasaligan kundi ang ating kolektibong pakikipaglaban,” Narciso said. 

This mirrors the call of various student publications to repeal R.A. 7079 or the Campus Journalism Act of 1991, and instead, pass a bill that will uphold genuine campus press freedom. 

“It’s high time na meron na tayong solid protection for student journalists, considering that these publications don’t do anything but report the truth,”  Tinig ng Plaridel Editor-in-Chief Cristina Chi said. 

Chi revealed that her publication received death threats, labelling them as “terrorist reporters” through text messages. 

“[T]hey just release stories about the community tapos biglang may red-tagging nang nagaganap,” Chi said.

“At its core, these red-tagging or [similar] actions have no place in our society,” she added.

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Youth most vulnerable to anti-terror law—solon, youth groups

Kabataan Partylist Rep. Sarah Elago, along with several youth groups and student councils, condemned the passage of the Anti-Terror Law (ATL), emphasizing it endangers human rights of Filipinos, especially the youth.

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Kabataan Partylist Rep. Sarah Elago (left) and UST Senior High School Student Council (SHS-SC) representative AJ dela Cruz (right) during an online press conference streamed via Student Christian Movement of the Philippines official Facebook page.

Kabataan Partylist Rep. Sarah Elago, along with several youth groups and student councils, condemned the passage of the Anti-Terror Law (ATL), emphasizing it endangers human rights of Filipinos, especially the youth. 

“[N]akasalalay dito ang pagpantay ng kinabukasan ng mga kabataang pilipino at ng ating buong bayan, kung kaya’t kinakailangan na tiyakin natin na ang mga kabataan, kasama ng […] sambayanang pilipino, ay nagkakaisa karapatan,” Elago said in an online conference yesterday, Jan. 16. 

Elago stressed that the country is not only in the state of public health emergency, but also in a “state of human rights emergency,” which is why she denounced the controversial ATL. 

“[I]to ay direkta sa House of Representatives na napakarami pang hindi nareresolba na mga kaso ng pamamaslang sa drug war at sa mga human rights violations na natala,” she said. 

Elago reminded the government to prioritize the health sector through free mass testing, intensified contact tracing, and stronger essential health service; and to continue extending help to the citizens who lost their jobs and source of income in this pandemic.


Youth red-tagging

Among the youth groups and student councils who called out the detrimental effects of ATL is the UST Senior High School Student Council (SHS-SC). 

SHS-SC representative AJ dela Cruz said that with the passage of ATL, many students are vulnerable to being red-tagged even if they are just doing their job. 

“[A]ng bagong Anti-Terrorism Law [ay] maaring magtag sa ating mga [student leader] bilang mga terorista kahit ginagawa lang naman natin ang ating mga trabaho,” dela Cruz said.

“[P]atunay ito na ang kalagayan ng mga kabataan na estudyante sa loob ng mga classroom ay hindi hiwalay sa kalagayan ng buong bansa,” he added.

Dela Cruz stressed that student leaders are not just mere event organizers. It is also their responsibility to “amplify issues” such as ATL to the student body. 

“Nakikita natin kung paano tayo nanunumbalik sa ating mga roots bilang mga [student leader] na nanguna sa paglaban kina Marcos at Erap, kung paano natin ginagampanan ang konstitusyonal na mandato bilang nation builders,” dela Cruz said. 

The press conference was streamed virtually in the official Facebook page of the Student Christian Movement of the Philippines. 

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Include youth in climate measures, environmental activists say

Environmental activists demanded the government Friday, Sept. 25, for the inclusion of youth participation in measures against the climate injustices in the country. 

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Environmental activists demanded the government Friday, Sept. 25, for the inclusion of youth participation in measures against the climate injustices in the country. 

“[A]dapt the youth agenda. You need to designate spaces for us. Co-power us and include us in plans and decision making,” Greenpeace Philippines campaigner Kisha Muana said. 

Muana stressed the need for a formal youth representation in local and national policies, citing the absence of policy actions concerning the youth’s needs in the government executive recovery plan.

According to Philippine Youth Climate Movement Director Ruzzel Morales, the youth can significantly contribute in provoking the system to generate changes. 

Morales called on the National Youth Commission to “genuinely advocate” the Filipino youth in the government. 

“Enough of your lip service. We want action and we want it now,” she said. 

Kabataan Partylist Rep. Sarah Elago urged Congress to take a stand on the environmental affairs of the country.

“Kailangan natin na patuloy ipadinig ang boses na naghuhumiyaw at naninindigan para sa pananagutan sa mga tao sa kinauukulan at para sa tungkulin ng bawat isang lingkod bayan na paglingkuran ang sambayanang Pilipino,” Elago said.

According to Elago, there are seven environment-related bills that are already in the period of debate in the Congress and Senate, while 13 have passed the third reading. 

The “Para sa Klimabukasan Global Day of Climate Action” digital strike and forum was co-organized by Youth Strike 4 Climate Philippines, Center for Energy, Ecology, and Development, I am Hampaslupa Inc., Living Laudato Si Philippines, Pangasinan Youth for Disaster Risk Reduction and Management, Philippine Movement for Climate Justice, STEP Philippines, SUSG Environment Committee, and We the Future PH inspired by climate activist Greta Thunberg. Wendell Adrian Quijado

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