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Tickets sold out, Thomasians ready for Game 2

THOUSANDS of Thomasians flooded the lobby of the Tan Yan Kee Student Center earlier today to avail tickets for the Game 2 of the Finals of the UAAP Season 76 Men’s Basketball Tournament.

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     THOUSANDS of Thomasians flooded the lobby of the Tan Yan Kee Student Center earlier today to avail tickets for the Game 2 of the Finals of the UAAP Season 76 Men’s Basketball Tournament.

     An estimated 2,500 students lined up inside and around the building, but only less than half were accommodated.

     “We only received 1,216 tickets. But with the number of people lining up, we’ll definitely try to get more tickets from the IPEA office,” said Student Organizations Coordinating Council (SOCC) Executive Vice President Edward Quiepo.

     “Ini-impose yung one is to one system kapag crucial yung game and sobrang in demand para ma-accommodate lahat ng Thomasians,” said SOCC President Jan Michael Borja.

     According to Borja, there were people who started lining up outside the building as early as 3 a.m. today. The SOCC started giving out stubs at 1 in the afternoon and started selling tickets at 1:30 p.m. Tickets were sold out by 5 p.m.

     The SOCC President said he expected the students’ ire and complaints, but he advised them to be understanding and cooperative instead.

     As to the tickets sold, Borja said that they only distributed the number of tickets that was given to them by the Institute of Physical Education and Athletics Office.

     In support to the players, tomorrow was declared as another “Tiger Day.”

     There will be another live streaming of the game at the Quadricentennial Pavillion for the students who were not able to buy tickets. Gates will open at 1 p.m.

     The UST Growling Tigers will once again battle against the De La Salle University Green Archers tomorrow at the Smart Araneta Coliseum in an attempt to seal this season’s championship title.

By Chleobel D. Birginias with reports from X.A.C. Gregorio, A.G. Mogato and R.J.C. Tabora
Photo taken by Anna Czarinah Q. Manalese

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UST remains sixth top school in November 2019 civil eng’g boards

The University remained as the sixth top-performing school for the second straight year in the November 2019 civil engineering licensure examinations. 

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The University remained as the sixth top-performing school for the second straight year in the November 2019 civil engineering licensure examinations. 

The University posted 81.86 percent passing rate or 176 out of 215 examinees passing the exams. 

This was a bit higher from last year’s score of 81.04 percent or 171 out of 221 examinees.

No Thomasians entered the topnotchers in this year’s exams.

Lou Mervin Tristan Mahilum of the University of San Carlos took the top spot with a rating of 93.25 percent.

Carlosa A. Hilado Memorial State College-Talisay was hailed as this year’s top-performing school after scoring 98 percent or 48 out of 50 examinees.

Meanwhile, the national passing rate declined to 43.18 percent or 6,510 out of 15,075 exam takers from 45.09 percent, or 6,262 out of 13,887 examinees in the last year’s exams.  

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‘Sexual violence is display of power, rooted from injustice’

Thomasian feminist scholars asserted that sexual violence is a “matter of making [a] person powerless so [one] can feel powerful” and is deeply rooted from perceived injustice of earlier sexual abuse during the “Say No: A Talk on Consent and Violence Against Women” held at the Central Laboratory Auditorium yesterday, Nov. 6.

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Photo by Schiatzi Lonzanida/TomasinoWeb

Thomasian feminist scholars asserted that sexual violence is a “matter of making [a] person powerless so [one] can feel powerful” and is deeply rooted from perceived injustice of earlier sexual abuse.

Asst. Prof. Rhodora Lynn Lintag-Tababa, a sociology professor from the Faculty of Arts and Letters, said during her talk about gender-based violence that sexual violence results from the idea of a person being more powerful and has more advantage than others during the “Say No: A Talk on Consent and Violence Against Women” held at the Central Laboratory Auditorium yesterday, Nov. 6.

“[This] violence is coming from the idea that in the first place, ‘I believe I am more powerful. I have more advantage over you,’ so some people have the tendency to really discriminate and undermine other people and practice their power, and therefore can result to harassment and violence,” according to Lintag-Tababa.

Lintag-Tababa said that the explanation as to why sexual harassment is rampant up to this time is because “personal is political.”

“’Away mag-asawa ‘yan. LQ ng mag-jowa ‘yan. Wala tayong pakialam diyan because that’s personal,’… That is being used by the society [to not] actually look into the matters of the women who are being abused,” she said. “Because it is something personal.”

Women’s issues and concerns, according to her, are often disregarded, treated as petty or irrelevant, and considered as a personal matter in which no one should interfere.

Lintag-Tababa mentioned American sociologist C. Wright Mills’ concept of sociological imagination which identifies the personal as a reflection of something greater or wider political issues.

“The personal should be political. That is the cry. That is the statement. That should be the slogan that should empower women,” she said.

Matter of sexual control

“Rape is a legal term [and] not a medical entity. It is a crime of violence. […] Rapists use sexual violence to dominate and degrade their victims and to express their own anger,” Asst. Prof. Ma. Georgina Manzano of College of Nursing said.

According to Manzano, rape is perpetrated not because of the sexual urge but because when a person’s self esteem is threatened, he or she projects the feeling of being helpless and powerless to the victim.

“It is an issue of having power and control…It is not about having sexual urge towards the person [who is] wearing bikini. [It is when a] person sees the woman as a vulnerable individual. He might take over the ability of [the woman] to fight or protect herself,” she said during the open forum.

“The abuser or the rapist may have [had] some childhood experiences that could have triggered this kind of aggression towards another person,” she added.

Photo by Schiatzi Lonzanida/TomasinoWeb

Manzano emphasized that in social media, when men see pictures of women in revealing clothes, the initial reaction is not to have control over the latter through force or threat but is attributed to the Philippine culture in which women are expected to wear Maria Clara clothes.

“It starts with you, and it will end with you,” Tababa said. “Violence starts with you, especially if you are not aware that you are actually harassing or doing something that is already promoting violence against women […] It will also end with you if you will do something about it.”

The event “Say No: A Talk on Consent and Violence Against Women” was organized by the Thomasian Debaters Council, in partnership with UST Hiraya, Fotomasino, Tiger Media Network, and TomasinoWeb.

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Thomasians dominate top ten of psychometrician boards

Fourteen Thomasians landed on the top ten of the October 2019 psychometrician licensure examinations with the University being named as the third top-performing school.

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Photo by Nathaniel Salcedo/TomasinoWeb

Fourteen Thomasians landed on the top ten of the October 2019 psychometrician licensure examinations with the University being named as the third top-performing school.

The University accumulated an average of 96.74 percent or 178 passers out of 184 examinees passing the exams, higher than last year’s 88.02 percent.

Darlene Angela Ilagan led the new batch of Thomasian psychometricians placing third with an average of 86.00 percent, followed by Michelle Angela Arellano, Catherine Manansala and Jean-Clarence Perias ranking fifth with an average of 85.60 percent.

Cyrille Ann Patrice Chua took the seventh spot with 85.20 percent mark, followed by Lejandro Raevino Toledo placing eight with an average of 85.00 percent mark

Alexandra Michaela Carmen, Mark Allen de Lara, Samantha Isabelle Soliven, Micah Victoria Tan, Julianne Khryztelle Torres, Cristina Gaspar Callagan and Angel Letun Hilario all took the ninth spot with 84.80 percent average.

Cristina Gaspar Callagan and Angel Letun Hilario tied at the tenth place with 84.60 percent average.

The Ateneo de Manila University emerged as the top-performing school having a perfect percent passing rate with all 57 examinees passing the exams.

The national passing rate rose to 63.78 percent or 6,800 out of 10,670 examinees passing the psychometrician licensure examinations higher than last year’s 47.73 percent or 4,035 out of 8,453 examinees.

Meanwhile, in the psychologist licensure examinations, Elaine Fatima Acosta Simon ranked fourth having an average of 84.60 percent.

Only the De La Salle University had a spot in the top-performing schools garnering an average of 95.24 percent or 20 out of 21 examinees making it to the cut.

The national passing rate also improved to 72.18 percent or 205 out of 284 examinees passing the psychologist licensure examinations from last year’s 67.02 percent. R. Velasco.

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