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NCBS raises environmental awareness

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     “PEOPLE need to be aware of our country’s environmental status.”

     In line with their Nursing Nature Week, the Nursing Central Board of Students (NCBS) organized a seminar titled “Naturize: An Environmental Colloquium” last September 27 at the Nursing Auditorium.

      Students, environmental advocates, and professionals alike agree upon the notion of environmental awareness among Filipinos. From the USTyro-free campaign established two years ago to the deliberation of “Naturize: An Environmental Colloquium,” the struggle for environmental awareness, protection, and preservation has clearly begun.

     “It’s really important, these kinds of symposium, because not everybody is aware of the status of our country. ‘It’s very alarming, though I’m not affected directly.’ It may sound cliché but this is also for the future generations,” event emcee Charles Henry Castañeda said in both English and Filipino.

     In a presentation delivered by one of the speakers, Marah Sayaman, the tangible truth behind the curtains of environmental predicament was revealed. According to Sayaman, the unparallel biodiversity confirms the depletion of the Philippines’ natural resources. A quarter of the country’s rivers are biologically dead, 23% of the forests are left for conservation, while 35,000 tons of solid waste is generated daily without recycling. With typhoons looming one after the other, nature has taken its toll on us. “Though there is hope still,” she added.

     “The symposium emphasizes a small change that can bring about a bigger and better advancement, not just to us, but to the people all over the country,” said Aradhana Ramchandani, a participant of the symposium.

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     “We have so many malls. Because of this we think that our country’s already developed. But what we don’t see is that because of those developments, we lose our natural resources. It’s a thousand fold more important than anything else,” she added in Filipino.

     Styrofoam is noted as one of the most harmful substances for the environment. It is non-biodegradable and takes thousands of years before it completely decomposes. It also takes up 20-30% of land fill space. As food containers, it can cause serious health problems. Styrene, for example, is a component of Styrofoam that is released when heated and can have toxic effect in the body.

     The concept of a Styrofoam-free campus started in 2006 when the NCBS launched “Nursing for Nature,” which implemented a handful of environmental projects. It was formally launched in the University in 2010 in partnership with the Student Organizations Coordinating Council (SOCC). The project reached out to students and food establishments within UST to discontinue the use of styrofoam containers. It was more of an advocacy for nature rather than a mandate for everyone to follow.

By Mia Rosienna Mallari

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UST caps performance in Oct 2016 chemist licensure exams

The University of Santo Tomas (UST) improved its standing in the October 2016 chemist licensure examinations with two Thomasians making it in top ten highest scorers, Professional Regulation Commission results showed.

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The University of Santo Tomas (UST) improved its standing in the October 2016 chemist licensure examinations with two Thomasians making it in top ten highest scorers, Professional Regulation Commission results showed.

 

Kent Gervacio shared the sixth spot with Lizette Mella of University of the Philippines-Diliman (UPD) with a score of 88.25 percent and Jinniel Cruz of Pamantasan ng Lungsod ng Maynila.

 

Robert Yee, who scored 87.75 percent,  shared the eighth place with Jerwin Taping of University of the Philippines-Manila.

 

UST garnered a 73.17 percent passing rate wherein 30 out of 41 Thomasians made the cut. This is higher than last year’s 66.67 percent  wherein only 16 passed the examination out of 48 examinees.

 

UPD was hailed as the top performing school with a passing rate of 95 percent while Mikel Allas of De La Salle University topped the board examinations with a score of 93.50 percent.

 

According to PRC, 559 passed the board examination out of 1,019 examinees nationwide.- VA Ferreras

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UST ranks 3rd in Sept 2016 mech eng’g boards

The University of Santo Tomas (UST) was ranked as the third best performing school in the September 2016 mechanical engineering licensure examinations, Professional Regulation Commission (PRC) results showed.

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The University of Santo Tomas (UST) was ranked as the third best performing school in the September 2016 mechanical engineering licensure examinations, Professional Regulation Commission (PRC) results showed.

 

UST garnered a 92 percent passing rate wherein 115 out 125 Thomasians passed the examination. This is higher than last year’s 63.21 percent, wherein only 67 out of 106 made the cut. No Thomasian made it in the top ten highest scorers.

 

University of the Philippines-Diliman topped the exam with a perfect passing rate. Meanwhile, Elso Elumbaring Jr. of Notre Dame University led the new batch of mechanical engineers with a score of 90.15 percent.

 

According to PRC, 3,110 passed the licensure examination out of 4,470 examinees nationwide.

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UST nursing program gains Pacucoa Level IV accreditation

The Philippine Association of Colleges and Universities Commission on Accreditation (Pacucoa) granted the highest accreditation status to the nursing program of the University of Santo Tomas.

The accreditation is effective until June 2020 and gives the University full autonomy in offering new graduate programs, open learning education programs and extension classes without the Commission on Higher Education’s (CHED) approval.

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NURSING

In reference to the Harry Potter series, College of Nursing freshmen enter through a “wall” made of cloth during the Freshmen Welcome Walk last August 2015.

The Philippine Association of Colleges and Universities Commission on Accreditation (Pacucoa) granted the highest accreditation status to the nursing program of the University of Santo Tomas.

The accreditation is effective until June 2020 and gives the University full autonomy in offering new graduate programs, open learning education programs and extension classes without the Commission on Higher Education’s (CHED) approval.

Aside from Pacucoa Level IV status, the program is also a CHED Center of Excellence in Nursing Education.

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