Connect with us

News

Girl interrupted: Where is she now?

The high school salutatorian who was interrupted during her graduation speech would become a Santo Tomas Scholar in the Accountancy program – if the Alfredo M. Velayo – College of Accountancy (AMV-CoA) would still accept her Certificate of Good Moral Character (CGMC) which has been withheld for months by her previous school.

Published

on

The high school salutatorian who was interrupted during her graduation speech would become a Santo Tomas Scholar in the Accountancy program – if the Alfredo M. Velayo – College of Accountancy (AMV-CoA) would still accept her Certificate of Good Moral Character (CGMC) which has been withheld for months by her previous school.

Krisel Mallari, a graduate of the Sto. Niño Parochial School (SNPS) in Quezon City, was given by the AMV-CoA until July 15 for her to submit the certificate, which she claims has been withheld by her school “without any valid reason.”

Taking it to the court

“Dalawang beses na nag-order ang DepEd (Department of Education) sa school ko na ibigay na sakin yung CGM[C] ko, pero ayaw talaga ibigay ng school ko,” Mallari said.

The DepEd ordered the SNPS to release Mallari’s CGMC back in May 18, but it was not heeded by the school.

Mallari, represented by her father Ernesto and the Public Attorney’s Office (PAO), took her case to the Court of Appeals and sued the SNPS and its registrar Yolanda Casero after the Quezon City Regional Trial Court Branch 216 denied Mallari’s petition.

The appellate court ruled in favor of Mallari on July 29, compelling the SNPS to issue the CGMC, but the school has not yet complied despite the ruling.

“Kanina (July 29) galing kami ng school. Hindi pa rin sila nag-issue. Hindi humarap samin yung mga school officials, ‘may orientation’ daw [sila,]” Mallari said in a text message.

On the part of the SNPS, they claim that there is no basis for them to issue a certificate.

“When you ask something, when you demand something, there must be a basis,” said SNPS legal counsel Atty. Maritonie Renee Ressureccion in a phone interview with TomasinoWeb. “She was not only asking for a certificate, but she is asking that we certify that she is of good moral character. We cannot do that after she lied.

“Sinasabi niya na she was not shown her grades and she did not know how these were computed. Eh hindi naman po totoo yun eh. She’s an honor student. Alam niya. Kasi binibigay yun. The cards are given to the students,” Ressureccion said.

She also questions the presentation of the PAO as she claims that Mallari’s family is not indigent.

“May mga criteria [ang pagre-represent ng PAO.] Indigence is one. She is represented by the Chief of the PAO because she is a minor, not employed. She is under the care and protection of her biological parents and I don’t think that they are indigent,” she said.

Appeal for help

While the entire legal fiasco was happening, Mallari also reached out to Central Student Council (CSC) President Anna Mariz Mangalili and the National Union of Students of the Philippines (NUSP) for assistance on her plight.

Mallari said that Mangalili has requested for an appointment with AMV-CoA Dean Patricia Empleo for the Mallaris to talk to the Dean on July 20.

However, Mallari said on July 28 through a Facebook message that her enrollment was still hanging in the balance.

TomasinoWeb is still trying to reach Mangalili to comment on the issue.

Mallari and her father met with NUSP National President Sarah Jane Elago on July 17.

“Halos wala pang tulog nang makapulong sila kaninang umaga hinggil sa akmang posisyon at aksyon sa kanilang kalagayan!” Elago said in a Facebook post.

“Ngayon ay nakararanas siya ng lalo pang panggigipit sa hindi pagbibigay sa kanya ng Certificate of Good Moral Character, dahilan para maantala ang kanyang pag-eenroll ngayong semestre at nanganganib pang maubusan ng slot sa piniling kurso sa kolehiyo,” she said.

The NUSP released a statement on July 30, saying that the SNPS’s continued withholding of Mallari’s CGMC “is an intensified culture of repression – a clear affront to the student’s democratic rights.”

“SNPS must thus be held accountable for such fascism. It must stop the political culture of repressing students via withholding (sic) documents of those whose valid assertions and responsible actions are not parallel with that of the school officials’,” the statement read further.

The NUSP is also appealing to the University to let Mallari enroll even without a CGMC.

“We appeal to the UST administration to open its arms to Krissel (sic) and to understand fully the reason why she lacks that one requirement. It is not her fault for speaking about justice and humanity. It is not negligence but responsibility. We ask the UST administration to support Mallari’s causa and let her enter the University’s academic halls and program without undue discrimination,” the statement read.

Furthermore, the militant student group is also urging the DepEd “to look into the merit of Krissel Mallari’s exposition and to conduct further investigation regarding school policies on honors,” adding that school policies should not supersede the constitutional rights of the students.

‘It’s in your hands’

With the SNPS is still refusing to issue a CGMC to Mallari, Ressureccion says that the possible solution to this problem lies in the hands of the University.

“Maybe UST can wait. The issue of the [C]GMC can be waived by the school,” she said.

However, Mallari says that her lawyer has assured her that she would be able to get her CGMC.

“Bukas (July 30) pupunta si Atty. [Persida Acosta] sa UST, ibibigay niya yung resolution ng Court of Appeals kay Dean Empleo para ma-ensure na yung enrollment ko,” she said.

Mallari has also asked the Court of Appeals on July 30 to cite the SNPS and its registrar in contempt for not following the ruling.

“Sana po magawan talaga ng paraan kasi sayang yung opportunity na makapag-aral ako sa UST. Nanghihinayang rin po kasi ako dun sa pagpasa ko sa Sto. Tomas Scholarship Examination,” she said.

Mallari came into the spotlight after a YouTube video showed her being interrupted by an announcer while delivering a speech different from the one which was approved by school authorities. Mallari resisted as she was repeatedly told to stop and take a seat.

She has previously alleged in reports that there were irregularities in the computation of her grades, but the SNPS has refuted this claim.

With reports from Jessamine Sagcal
Screengrab from YouTube

Comments

News

UST remains sixth top school in November 2019 civil eng’g boards

The University remained as the sixth top-performing school for the second straight year in the November 2019 civil engineering licensure examinations. 

Published

on

The University remained as the sixth top-performing school for the second straight year in the November 2019 civil engineering licensure examinations. 

The University posted 81.86 percent passing rate or 176 out of 215 examinees passing the exams. 

This was a bit higher from last year’s score of 81.04 percent or 171 out of 221 examinees.

No Thomasians entered the topnotchers in this year’s exams.

Lou Mervin Tristan Mahilum of the University of San Carlos took the top spot with a rating of 93.25 percent.

Carlosa A. Hilado Memorial State College-Talisay was hailed as this year’s top-performing school after scoring 98 percent or 48 out of 50 examinees.

Meanwhile, the national passing rate declined to 43.18 percent or 6,510 out of 15,075 exam takers from 45.09 percent, or 6,262 out of 13,887 examinees in the last year’s exams.  

Comments

Continue Reading

News

‘Sexual violence is display of power, rooted from injustice’

Thomasian feminist scholars asserted that sexual violence is a “matter of making [a] person powerless so [one] can feel powerful” and is deeply rooted from perceived injustice of earlier sexual abuse during the “Say No: A Talk on Consent and Violence Against Women” held at the Central Laboratory Auditorium yesterday, Nov. 6.

Published

on

Photo by Schiatzi Lonzanida/TomasinoWeb

Thomasian feminist scholars asserted that sexual violence is a “matter of making [a] person powerless so [one] can feel powerful” and is deeply rooted from perceived injustice of earlier sexual abuse.

Asst. Prof. Rhodora Lynn Lintag-Tababa, a sociology professor from the Faculty of Arts and Letters, said during her talk about gender-based violence that sexual violence results from the idea of a person being more powerful and has more advantage than others during the “Say No: A Talk on Consent and Violence Against Women” held at the Central Laboratory Auditorium yesterday, Nov. 6.

“[This] violence is coming from the idea that in the first place, ‘I believe I am more powerful. I have more advantage over you,’ so some people have the tendency to really discriminate and undermine other people and practice their power, and therefore can result to harassment and violence,” according to Lintag-Tababa.

Lintag-Tababa said that the explanation as to why sexual harassment is rampant up to this time is because “personal is political.”

“’Away mag-asawa ‘yan. LQ ng mag-jowa ‘yan. Wala tayong pakialam diyan because that’s personal,’… That is being used by the society [to not] actually look into the matters of the women who are being abused,” she said. “Because it is something personal.”

Women’s issues and concerns, according to her, are often disregarded, treated as petty or irrelevant, and considered as a personal matter in which no one should interfere.

Lintag-Tababa mentioned American sociologist C. Wright Mills’ concept of sociological imagination which identifies the personal as a reflection of something greater or wider political issues.

“The personal should be political. That is the cry. That is the statement. That should be the slogan that should empower women,” she said.

Matter of sexual control

“Rape is a legal term [and] not a medical entity. It is a crime of violence. […] Rapists use sexual violence to dominate and degrade their victims and to express their own anger,” Asst. Prof. Ma. Georgina Manzano of College of Nursing said.

According to Manzano, rape is perpetrated not because of the sexual urge but because when a person’s self esteem is threatened, he or she projects the feeling of being helpless and powerless to the victim.

“It is an issue of having power and control…It is not about having sexual urge towards the person [who is] wearing bikini. [It is when a] person sees the woman as a vulnerable individual. He might take over the ability of [the woman] to fight or protect herself,” she said during the open forum.

“The abuser or the rapist may have [had] some childhood experiences that could have triggered this kind of aggression towards another person,” she added.

Photo by Schiatzi Lonzanida/TomasinoWeb

Manzano emphasized that in social media, when men see pictures of women in revealing clothes, the initial reaction is not to have control over the latter through force or threat but is attributed to the Philippine culture in which women are expected to wear Maria Clara clothes.

“It starts with you, and it will end with you,” Tababa said. “Violence starts with you, especially if you are not aware that you are actually harassing or doing something that is already promoting violence against women […] It will also end with you if you will do something about it.”

The event “Say No: A Talk on Consent and Violence Against Women” was organized by the Thomasian Debaters Council, in partnership with UST Hiraya, Fotomasino, Tiger Media Network, and TomasinoWeb.

Comments

Continue Reading

News

Thomasians dominate top ten of psychometrician boards

Fourteen Thomasians landed on the top ten of the October 2019 psychometrician licensure examinations with the University being named as the third top-performing school.

Published

on

Photo by Nathaniel Salcedo/TomasinoWeb

Fourteen Thomasians landed on the top ten of the October 2019 psychometrician licensure examinations with the University being named as the third top-performing school.

The University accumulated an average of 96.74 percent or 178 passers out of 184 examinees passing the exams, higher than last year’s 88.02 percent.

Darlene Angela Ilagan led the new batch of Thomasian psychometricians placing third with an average of 86.00 percent, followed by Michelle Angela Arellano, Catherine Manansala and Jean-Clarence Perias ranking fifth with an average of 85.60 percent.

Cyrille Ann Patrice Chua took the seventh spot with 85.20 percent mark, followed by Lejandro Raevino Toledo placing eight with an average of 85.00 percent mark

Alexandra Michaela Carmen, Mark Allen de Lara, Samantha Isabelle Soliven, Micah Victoria Tan, Julianne Khryztelle Torres, Cristina Gaspar Callagan and Angel Letun Hilario all took the ninth spot with 84.80 percent average.

Cristina Gaspar Callagan and Angel Letun Hilario tied at the tenth place with 84.60 percent average.

The Ateneo de Manila University emerged as the top-performing school having a perfect percent passing rate with all 57 examinees passing the exams.

The national passing rate rose to 63.78 percent or 6,800 out of 10,670 examinees passing the psychometrician licensure examinations higher than last year’s 47.73 percent or 4,035 out of 8,453 examinees.

Meanwhile, in the psychologist licensure examinations, Elaine Fatima Acosta Simon ranked fourth having an average of 84.60 percent.

Only the De La Salle University had a spot in the top-performing schools garnering an average of 95.24 percent or 20 out of 21 examinees making it to the cut.

The national passing rate also improved to 72.18 percent or 205 out of 284 examinees passing the psychologist licensure examinations from last year’s 67.02 percent. R. Velasco.

Comments

Continue Reading

Trending