Connect with us

News

Girl interrupted: Where is she now?

The high school salutatorian who was interrupted during her graduation speech would become a Santo Tomas Scholar in the Accountancy program – if the Alfredo M. Velayo – College of Accountancy (AMV-CoA) would still accept her Certificate of Good Moral Character (CGMC) which has been withheld for months by her previous school.

Published

on

The high school salutatorian who was interrupted during her graduation speech would become a Santo Tomas Scholar in the Accountancy program – if the Alfredo M. Velayo – College of Accountancy (AMV-CoA) would still accept her Certificate of Good Moral Character (CGMC) which has been withheld for months by her previous school.

Krisel Mallari, a graduate of the Sto. Niño Parochial School (SNPS) in Quezon City, was given by the AMV-CoA until July 15 for her to submit the certificate, which she claims has been withheld by her school “without any valid reason.”

Taking it to the court

“Dalawang beses na nag-order ang DepEd (Department of Education) sa school ko na ibigay na sakin yung CGM[C] ko, pero ayaw talaga ibigay ng school ko,” Mallari said.

The DepEd ordered the SNPS to release Mallari’s CGMC back in May 18, but it was not heeded by the school.

Mallari, represented by her father Ernesto and the Public Attorney’s Office (PAO), took her case to the Court of Appeals and sued the SNPS and its registrar Yolanda Casero after the Quezon City Regional Trial Court Branch 216 denied Mallari’s petition.

The appellate court ruled in favor of Mallari on July 29, compelling the SNPS to issue the CGMC, but the school has not yet complied despite the ruling.

“Kanina (July 29) galing kami ng school. Hindi pa rin sila nag-issue. Hindi humarap samin yung mga school officials, ‘may orientation’ daw [sila,]” Mallari said in a text message.

On the part of the SNPS, they claim that there is no basis for them to issue a certificate.

“When you ask something, when you demand something, there must be a basis,” said SNPS legal counsel Atty. Maritonie Renee Ressureccion in a phone interview with TomasinoWeb. “She was not only asking for a certificate, but she is asking that we certify that she is of good moral character. We cannot do that after she lied.

“Sinasabi niya na she was not shown her grades and she did not know how these were computed. Eh hindi naman po totoo yun eh. She’s an honor student. Alam niya. Kasi binibigay yun. The cards are given to the students,” Ressureccion said.

She also questions the presentation of the PAO as she claims that Mallari’s family is not indigent.

“May mga criteria [ang pagre-represent ng PAO.] Indigence is one. She is represented by the Chief of the PAO because she is a minor, not employed. She is under the care and protection of her biological parents and I don’t think that they are indigent,” she said.

Appeal for help

While the entire legal fiasco was happening, Mallari also reached out to Central Student Council (CSC) President Anna Mariz Mangalili and the National Union of Students of the Philippines (NUSP) for assistance on her plight.

Mallari said that Mangalili has requested for an appointment with AMV-CoA Dean Patricia Empleo for the Mallaris to talk to the Dean on July 20.

However, Mallari said on July 28 through a Facebook message that her enrollment was still hanging in the balance.

TomasinoWeb is still trying to reach Mangalili to comment on the issue.

Mallari and her father met with NUSP National President Sarah Jane Elago on July 17.

“Halos wala pang tulog nang makapulong sila kaninang umaga hinggil sa akmang posisyon at aksyon sa kanilang kalagayan!” Elago said in a Facebook post.

“Ngayon ay nakararanas siya ng lalo pang panggigipit sa hindi pagbibigay sa kanya ng Certificate of Good Moral Character, dahilan para maantala ang kanyang pag-eenroll ngayong semestre at nanganganib pang maubusan ng slot sa piniling kurso sa kolehiyo,” she said.

The NUSP released a statement on July 30, saying that the SNPS’s continued withholding of Mallari’s CGMC “is an intensified culture of repression – a clear affront to the student’s democratic rights.”

“SNPS must thus be held accountable for such fascism. It must stop the political culture of repressing students via withholding (sic) documents of those whose valid assertions and responsible actions are not parallel with that of the school officials’,” the statement read further.

The NUSP is also appealing to the University to let Mallari enroll even without a CGMC.

“We appeal to the UST administration to open its arms to Krissel (sic) and to understand fully the reason why she lacks that one requirement. It is not her fault for speaking about justice and humanity. It is not negligence but responsibility. We ask the UST administration to support Mallari’s causa and let her enter the University’s academic halls and program without undue discrimination,” the statement read.

Furthermore, the militant student group is also urging the DepEd “to look into the merit of Krissel Mallari’s exposition and to conduct further investigation regarding school policies on honors,” adding that school policies should not supersede the constitutional rights of the students.

‘It’s in your hands’

With the SNPS is still refusing to issue a CGMC to Mallari, Ressureccion says that the possible solution to this problem lies in the hands of the University.

“Maybe UST can wait. The issue of the [C]GMC can be waived by the school,” she said.

However, Mallari says that her lawyer has assured her that she would be able to get her CGMC.

“Bukas (July 30) pupunta si Atty. [Persida Acosta] sa UST, ibibigay niya yung resolution ng Court of Appeals kay Dean Empleo para ma-ensure na yung enrollment ko,” she said.

Mallari has also asked the Court of Appeals on July 30 to cite the SNPS and its registrar in contempt for not following the ruling.

“Sana po magawan talaga ng paraan kasi sayang yung opportunity na makapag-aral ako sa UST. Nanghihinayang rin po kasi ako dun sa pagpasa ko sa Sto. Tomas Scholarship Examination,” she said.

Mallari came into the spotlight after a YouTube video showed her being interrupted by an announcer while delivering a speech different from the one which was approved by school authorities. Mallari resisted as she was repeatedly told to stop and take a seat.

She has previously alleged in reports that there were irregularities in the computation of her grades, but the SNPS has refuted this claim.

With reports from Jessamine Sagcal
Screengrab from YouTube

Comments

News

UST implements ‘enriched virtual mode’ next academic year; extends financial assistance

Rector Rev. Fr. Richard Ang, O.P., in a letter dated May 26, announced that the first term of the academic year will be facilitated through “Enriched Virtual Mode” in which instructors will employ both online and offline remote learning strategies.

Published

on

Aliah Danseco/TomasinoWeb

The Office of the Rector urged everyone “to respond, cope, survive, and persist” as it sets to proceed with the upcoming Academic Year 2020-2021 through remote online and offline delivery of classes, Wednesday, May 27.

Rector Rev. Fr. Richard Ang, O.P., in a letter dated May 26, announced that the first term of the academic year will be facilitated through “Enriched Virtual Mode” in which instructors will employ both online and offline remote learning strategies.

“The University shall implement a mode of instruction rooted in the principles of communion and encounter, one that promotes dialogue and ensures accessibility and flexibility in learning,” Ang said regarding the plan to continue learning with the new guidelines.

“We shall optimize the expertise of our faculty, not only through team-teaching approaches, but through carefully planned combinations,” the letter also read.

Face-to-face mode of instruction will only be done once “allowed by government regulations, and shall be done with the strict implementation of public health standards for everyone’s safety.”

Financial assistance

The University further elaborated the plans to allocate financial assistance to its students struggling to continue education with school fees.

The letter stated: “[I]n consideration of the adverse economic impact… the University has taken the initiative to provide our students financial assistance.”

Some of the plans for the upcoming academic year include no tuition fee increase, adjustment of the table of fees, continuation of the scholarships granted during the second term of A.Y. 2019-2020 until the end of the year, and implementation of staggered payment schemes, among others.

Academic Year 2020-2021 is set to start this August 13, with the first term ending on December 18.

Comments

Continue Reading

News

Write the truth—Atom Araullo, DepEd to campus journalists

Araullo said that it is not enough to present the facts, and as journalists it is part of the responsibility to reveal the truth behind the facts and make it into a story in which the audience can relate to.

Published

on

Screengrab from #CampJourn webinar

Media professionals gathered yesterday in a webinar, “#CAMPJOURN: Campus and Community Journalism in a Time of Pandemic,” to encourage campus journalists to report the truth despite the changing journalism landscape.

GMA7 news broadcast journalist Atom Araullo highlighted the importance of the balance in reporting and power in storytelling.

“Sa trabaho natin, napakahalaga na nakukuha natin yung tamang impormasyon… But you also have to make sure that yung information mo is something that will illuminate kung ano yung katotohanan,” he said during the online forum.

Araullo said that it is not enough to present the facts, and as journalists it is part of the responsibility to reveal the truth behind the facts and make it into a story in which the audience can relate to.

“People say that there are two sides of a story. That’s true,” he said. “Pero the truth is just one thing. There is just one objective reality.”

Department of Education Bureau of Curriculum Development Director Jocelyn Andaya told campus journalists to “keep writing.” 

She stressed that during the ongoing pandemic, there is a need for a purpose and this is the time in which correct and fact-checked news stories are needed. 

“[D]on’t just write because you want to this time,” she said. “Sometimes I was told by campus journalists…’it takes courage to defy,’…It takes courage, but defiance has to be tempered with correct information.”

“You have to make sure that what you write about is true,” she said. 

Emotion in news stories

Journalists, according to Araullo, are not just robots gathering information, which means that emotions and critical thinking are two factors to be considered and taken advantage of when writing a story. 

“Bilang journalist, yung personal feelings mo, hindi mo ‘yan mahihiwalay sa eventual story na gagawin mo,” he said “[Y]ou can be an effective journalist even if you acknowledge…na ikaw ay isang tao na mayoong emosyon at mayroong panindigan.”

Araullo considers emotions as a “good thing” when it comes to projecting news because the act of feeling, for him, gives the journalist an idea of the plight of the ordinary citizens. 

“Kahit na anong pilit, kahit na anong subok mo, at kahit na lokohin mo yung sarili mo na kaya mong gawin ‘yon, it’s not possible kasi you have to make choices along the way.” he said.

“[Y]ou have to choose how to write it. With all of those choices, you are already shaping the story,” he added.

Araullo emphasized that there is also the need to consider other fundamentals of journalism like accuracy and balance and the importance of putting context in stories. 

“[A]no ba yung surrounding situation na kinalalagyan nitong mga facts na ito? Sigurado ba ‘ko na yung facts na ito ay hindi cherry-picked?” he said.

Issue to impact

Araullo said stories should not only induce feelings of happiness, sadness, or anger, but also urge the citizens “to find solutions necessary to make change.”

To do that, he said that journalists must hone their storytelling prowess, “from stories to solutions, from issues to impact, ” and create connection with the audience.

“[N]aghahanap ka ng isang paraan na maintindihan ng audience na kahit na hindi siya yung nakakaranas nitong istoryang ‘to, nararamdaman niya kung anong epekto nito doon sa nakakaranas ng istorya,” he said.

Additionally, Internews media specialist Kat Raymundo emphasized the “framework of accountability.” 

Media, according to her, serves as a “tool” that could either be helpful or used for political reasons, which is why journalists must use it to empower people to provide for their needs.

“[W]e must restore public trust and credibility, and journalism in a changing world must work on self-regulation and social responsibility,” she said. 

Raymundo urged the budding journalists to stop being “passive consumers” of news and instead make use of the old and new media as an “informed citizen” who interacts with other media users.

“Let’s be aware, complain, or even [encourage] criticism, because media development will not happen if the public does not demand more from this powerful institution,” she said. Coleen Ruth Abiog and Jayziel Khim Budino

Comments

Continue Reading

News

CSC President proposes learning adjustments to CHED

In an online meeting yesterday with the Commission on Higher Education (CHED), Central Student Council (CSC) President Robert Dominic Gonzales raised some of the students’ concerns on flexible learning in the University.

Published

on

Photo by Julius Villavieja

In an online meeting yesterday with the Commission on Higher Education (CHED), Central Student Council (CSC) President Robert Dominic Gonzales raised some of the students’ concerns on flexible learning in the University.

“We cannot deny the fact that this pandemic has been very anti-poor and further marginalizes those who are underprivileged,” Gonzales said in the speech he delivered which he posted on his Twitter account.

He urged the government to focus on the problems brought about by the pandemic and “polish everything that needs to be polished” as we shift to the new normal.

“How do we ensure that quality education combined with the welfare of the community are both considered?” Gonzales said.

Among the recommendations Gonzales presented to CHED are mandatory consultation between teachers and students, adjustments in online classes, training and workshops for faculty members, and consideration of the well-being of the stakeholders.

“Online classes, for students, are seemingly becoming a ‘compliance issue’ rather than a ‘learning matter,’” he said.

“We proposed here minimizing the number of requirements and assessments given to students while making sure that the intended learning outcomes are still received,” he added. 

For synchronous online classes, Gonzales suggested provision of recorded lectures in case students would not be able to attend, while for asynchronous online classes, all needed material shall be made available.

Gonzales also acknowledged that not only the students but also the faculty members are having a difficult time adjusting to the transition of the learning system, which is why training and workshops should be implemented.

“Among the best practices that the University implores is the constant and continuous dialogues and consultations being conducted between the student councils and the administration,” he said. 

“This is an important aspect that everyone must consider, because again, we go back to the fact that the students are the major stakeholders of the University,” he added.

General concerns like unavailability of resources, inconducive learning environment, and adjustment of fees were also reiterated by Gonzales at the end of his talk.

“In our efforts to alleviate the problems that everyone is facing, in one way or another, and while online classes may not be the most effective means of delivering education… I am hoping that these concerns and recommendations get considered for all institutions in our country,” he said. 

Comments

Continue Reading

Trending