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Ex-UST academic vice-rector, Artlets dean dies at 71

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Former Vice-Rector for Academic Affairs Armando de Jesus passed away last July 2 due to prostate cancer. He was 71 years old.

De Jesus served as the academic vice-rector of the University of Santo Tomas from 2003 to 2006. He was the first lay vice-rector in the University’s history.

Online faculty evaluation and faculty records were implemented during his term.

He also served as dean of the Faculty of Arts and Letters for two terms; from 2000 to 2003, and 2006 until 2008.

De Jesus started teaching sociology at the University from 1972 until 2011.

He was also the former chairperson of the Department of Social Sciences and director of the University’s Social Research Center.

De Jesus received the Benavides Award last 2008.

He earned his degree in theology from the University in 1969.

De Jesus obtained his master’s degree in sociology in 1995 and his doctorate in educational engagement in 2000 from UST.

His remains lay in his home at Km. 39, Pulong Buhangin, Sta. Maria, Bulacan.

A funeral mass was held earlier today, July 9, at the Nuestra Señora del Carmen Parish Church before his remains were interred at Mt. Carmel Memorial Park.

Photo grabbed from the UST Official Facebook page

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Expect a more critical, careful Salinggawi with ‘OneFORESTpaña,’ coach tells

Mark Chaiwalla, the head coach and an alumnus of Salinggawi, assured the Thomasian community that the troupe is now more careful and critical, especially being half a point shy from being a podium finisher last year. 

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Photo by Alec Go

In this year’s UAAP Cheerdance Competition, the University’s Salinggawi Dance Troupe is set to enchant with their nature and magical theme, Salinggawi coach said. 

Mark Chaiwalla, the head coach and an alumnus of Salinggawi, assured the Thomasian community that the troupe is now more careful and critical, especially being half a point shy from being a podium finisher last year. 

“How they took it last year parang they are more careful and they are more critical with what they are doing this year,” Chaiwalla expressed in an exclusive interview with TomasinoWeb

He added: “Whether we land on the podium or not they are always […] motivated naman. They do not lose the motivation depending on where they would land on from the previous year.”

Mark Chaiwalla, UST Salinggawi head coach | Larizza Lucas/TomasinoWeb

In dealing with pressure and expectations, however, Chaiwalla said that those “[are] always there, what we do is just to remind ourselves to always do our best.”

He also clarified that it’s not the pressure and expectations that would push them to do the yearly competition, but the primary goal is “to always serve the Thomasian community.”

As for the theme for this year’s competition, Chaiwalla admitted that initially, the theme was supposed to focus on the teaser that Salinggawi released on Twitter; hinting that it would be a Lady Gaga theme, continuing the Beyonce stunt last competition.  

However, they decided to pick another theme wherein they could use the fortes of the coaches, specifically the dance coach. 

“We chose a theme kung saan mailalabas talaga nung dance coach yung strength niya. Yung theme kasi mas maapektuhan niya ‘yung sayaw rather than the cheer element, so we chose a theme wherein our dance coach would really use his strength that’s why we chose this theme,” Chaiwalla added. 

The idea for this year’s Cheerdance Competition would be enchanted. “There’s a touch of magical feeling and it’s very related to nature,” he said. with reports from Sam Magbuhat.

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UST remains sixth top school in November 2019 civil eng’g boards

The University remained as the sixth top-performing school for the second straight year in the November 2019 civil engineering licensure examinations. 

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The University remained as the sixth top-performing school for the second straight year in the November 2019 civil engineering licensure examinations. 

The University posted 81.86 percent passing rate or 176 out of 215 examinees passing the exams. 

This was a bit higher from last year’s score of 81.04 percent or 171 out of 221 examinees.

No Thomasians entered the topnotchers in this year’s exams.

Lou Mervin Tristan Mahilum of the University of San Carlos took the top spot with a rating of 93.25 percent.

Carlosa A. Hilado Memorial State College-Talisay was hailed as this year’s top-performing school after scoring 98 percent or 48 out of 50 examinees.

Meanwhile, the national passing rate declined to 43.18 percent or 6,510 out of 15,075 exam takers from 45.09 percent, or 6,262 out of 13,887 examinees in the last year’s exams.  

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‘Sexual violence is display of power, rooted from injustice’

Thomasian feminist scholars asserted that sexual violence is a “matter of making [a] person powerless so [one] can feel powerful” and is deeply rooted from perceived injustice of earlier sexual abuse during the “Say No: A Talk on Consent and Violence Against Women” held at the Central Laboratory Auditorium yesterday, Nov. 6.

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Photo by Schiatzi Lonzanida/TomasinoWeb

Thomasian feminist scholars asserted that sexual violence is a “matter of making [a] person powerless so [one] can feel powerful” and is deeply rooted from perceived injustice of earlier sexual abuse.

Asst. Prof. Rhodora Lynn Lintag-Tababa, a sociology professor from the Faculty of Arts and Letters, said during her talk about gender-based violence that sexual violence results from the idea of a person being more powerful and has more advantage than others during the “Say No: A Talk on Consent and Violence Against Women” held at the Central Laboratory Auditorium yesterday, Nov. 6.

“[This] violence is coming from the idea that in the first place, ‘I believe I am more powerful. I have more advantage over you,’ so some people have the tendency to really discriminate and undermine other people and practice their power, and therefore can result to harassment and violence,” according to Lintag-Tababa.

Lintag-Tababa said that the explanation as to why sexual harassment is rampant up to this time is because “personal is political.”

“’Away mag-asawa ‘yan. LQ ng mag-jowa ‘yan. Wala tayong pakialam diyan because that’s personal,’… That is being used by the society [to not] actually look into the matters of the women who are being abused,” she said. “Because it is something personal.”

Women’s issues and concerns, according to her, are often disregarded, treated as petty or irrelevant, and considered as a personal matter in which no one should interfere.

Lintag-Tababa mentioned American sociologist C. Wright Mills’ concept of sociological imagination which identifies the personal as a reflection of something greater or wider political issues.

“The personal should be political. That is the cry. That is the statement. That should be the slogan that should empower women,” she said.

Matter of sexual control

“Rape is a legal term [and] not a medical entity. It is a crime of violence. […] Rapists use sexual violence to dominate and degrade their victims and to express their own anger,” Asst. Prof. Ma. Georgina Manzano of College of Nursing said.

According to Manzano, rape is perpetrated not because of the sexual urge but because when a person’s self esteem is threatened, he or she projects the feeling of being helpless and powerless to the victim.

“It is an issue of having power and control…It is not about having sexual urge towards the person [who is] wearing bikini. [It is when a] person sees the woman as a vulnerable individual. He might take over the ability of [the woman] to fight or protect herself,” she said during the open forum.

“The abuser or the rapist may have [had] some childhood experiences that could have triggered this kind of aggression towards another person,” she added.

Photo by Schiatzi Lonzanida/TomasinoWeb

Manzano emphasized that in social media, when men see pictures of women in revealing clothes, the initial reaction is not to have control over the latter through force or threat but is attributed to the Philippine culture in which women are expected to wear Maria Clara clothes.

“It starts with you, and it will end with you,” Tababa said. “Violence starts with you, especially if you are not aware that you are actually harassing or doing something that is already promoting violence against women […] It will also end with you if you will do something about it.”

The event “Say No: A Talk on Consent and Violence Against Women” was organized by the Thomasian Debaters Council, in partnership with UST Hiraya, Fotomasino, Tiger Media Network, and TomasinoWeb.

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