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Tagle tells youth: ‘Examine ways, save creation’

Manila Archbishop Luis Antonio Cardinal Tagle called on everyone especially the youth to “examine [their] ways” in his homily during the enthronement of Nuestra Señora del Santísimo Rosario, Thursday, September 26. 

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Manila Archbishop Luis Antonio Cardinal Tagle called on everyone especially the youth to “examine [their] ways” in his homily during the enthronement of Nuestra Señora del Santísimo Rosario, Thursday, September 26. 

In the mass at the UST Chapel, Cardinal Tagle emphasized the need to consider and examine ways in order to establish love in every creation. 

“Consider your ways. Examine your ways. How eager are we to construct not only a physical house but what Pope Paul VI said ‘the civilization of love,’” Tagle expressed. 

He further added: “Do we feel a sense of urgency to build up homes for young people? […] To start acting? To save what is left of creation?”

The cardinal also encouraged the youth to follow Mary in “letting God build us as homes of Jesus.”

“Sana katulad ni Maria ang kabataan natin simulan sa sarili na hayaan ng Diyos na itayo tayo bilang tahanan ni Hesus,” he said. 

The enthronement rites of the image of the Our Lady marks the start of the novena masses in honor of Nuestra Señora del Santísimo Rosario and in preparation for the 77th fiesta anniversary of Santísimo Rosario Parish – UST on October 6. 

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Rector reminds Thomasians to ‘look back at Christ’ in Paskuhan Mass

The University’s Rector Magnificus reminded Thomasians that advent is a period to remember and to anticipate, and to celebrate Christ’s coming during the Paskuhan opening mass at the Plaza Mayor Monday, Dec. 2.

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The University’s Rector Magnificus reminded Thomasians that advent is a period to remember and to anticipate, and to celebrate Christ’s coming.

Very Rev. Fr. Herminio Dagohoy, O.P. stated that remembering means honoring and recognizing the things you have received during the last Christmas of your life, and so he thanked the UST for being a wonderful community, during the Paskuhan opening mass at the Plaza Mayor Monday, Dec. 2.

Quoting the words of Soren Kierkegaard, Dagohoy O.P. said that “life can only be understood backwards; but it must be lived forwards.”

“Advent is literally coming home. […] During advent, we are asked to look back at Christ’s coming as a man while at the same time looking forward in eager anticipation of [His] kingdom when He returns,” said Dagohoy.

He compared the Filipinos coming home from the other countries to advent, saying that despite the long hours of layover at the airport, they will still be waiting with happiness knowing that they will soon see their loved ones. He said that, “that feeling of estrangement, anticipation and expectant joy—that is advent.”

The Rector also urged Thomasians to recognize their insufficiency and their need for God, and to pray the prayer of advent “Come Lord Jesus” when their days are covered with dark clouds.

“God loves his people tenderly embracing their weaknesses and imperfections. For God’s loving heart, it is all about us,” Dagohoy said.

“Sa Pasko tinitingnan tayo ng Diyos. Ang sabi niya: para sa inyo ‘to, ang Pasko ay para sa’yo,” he added.

The opening of décor around the campus followed the mass led by Manila City Mayor Francisco “Isko Moreno” Domagoso and Vice-Mayor Honey Lacuna, and the traditional “agape” for the Thomasian community. H. Camba

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Pabillo: Show solidarity through prayer amid persecution

Manila Auxiliary Bishop Broderick Pabillo emphasized solidarity as a response to persecutions during the Red Wednesday campaign in the University in commemoration of persecuted Christians worldwide.

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Manila Auxiliary Bishop Broderick Pabillo emphasized solidarity as a response to persecutions during the Red Wednesday campaign in the University in commemoration of persecuted Christians worldwide.

[W]e cannot do much, but we don’t keep silent. And part of that solidarity is shown by the celebration of Red Wednesday. We show our solidarity by our prayers. Prayers for those who are persecuted—that they may remain strong, that they may persevere…” Pabillo said during the Red Wednesday mass at the Santísimo Rosario Parish Church.

People have different ways of reacting on persecutions, and according to him, there are those who would fight violently, those who would collaborate with the prosecutors, and those who just keep silent.

“Our reaction to the persecutions is not collaboration, is not fighting against, is not indifference, but solidarity. Solidarity is shown by our prayers for the persecuted, for ourselves, … for the persecutors,” Pabillo said.

Apathy, he stressed, is a common response among majority of the Christians.

“Apathy. Indifference…They don’t react when our priests are killed, when our bishops and our priests and nuns are being dragged into court, accused with cases. They don’t react. Apathetic,” he said.

Pabillo explained that persecution has been happening since Ancient Christianity in many countries, and it includes not only killings but also destruction of places of worship, lawsuits against Christians, and denigration of the Church’s teachings.

“[T]he teachings of the Church are being maligned, even in the Philippines. Our teaching about the treaty, about the bible, is being maligned…Our teachings against divorce, against abortion, and it some countries, against death penaltythey are being maligned. These are also part of persecutions,” he said.

“And even in our times, in the Philippines, there are people who clap their hands when the President malign our Church leaders and our Church teachings,” Pabillo added.

Despite the problems such as contradicting beliefs, he maintains that persecution is not the answer.

“We still ourselves in front of these persecutions that can also come our way. At the same time, during Red Wednesday, we pray for the persecutors. We pray for the persecutors that they may realize that persecution is not the answer to their problems. Death is not the answer…Persecution is not the answer.”

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‘Believe, suffer for the Church and Christ’ −Pabillo

Manila Auxiliary Bishop Broderick Pabillo urged the faithful to strengthen their faith especially these times when the Church is often labeled as irrelevant and politically incorrect during mass for the feast of the 15 Thomasian Martyrs yesterday, Nov. 6 at the Santísimo Rosario Parish-UST.

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Photo by Nathaniel Salcedo/TomasinoWeb

Manila Auxiliary Bishop Broderick Pabillo urged the faithful to strengthen their faith especially these times when the Church is often labeled as irrelevant and politically incorrect.

 

Pabillo said that a lot of Christians are afraid to speak up most especially on pressing issues like the rampant extrajudicial killings in the country during mass for the feast of the 15 Thomasian Martyrs yesterday, Nov. 6 at the Santísimo Rosario Parish-UST.

 

“Before, people would encourage us to live the Christian values and those who live the Christian values are admired. But in the present times, if you live the Christian values, people would make fun of you and curse you,” Pabillo said.

 

Pabillo also asserted that a lot of people still believe that abortion, death penalty, and same-sex marriage are human rights.

 

“If we speak up that life is important, we are often bypassed by people. Yet, they are even trying to push that abortion is a human right,” Pabillo shared.

 

He emphasized the importance of accepting the fact that being a Christian will always have its small and big consequences and is reflected on how the 15 Thomasian martyrs offered their lives to God.

 

“We do not only have the privilege to believe, but we also have the privilege to suffer for the sake of Christ”

 

The 15 Thomasian Martyrs are students, professors, priests and administrators of the University who were killed in the religious persecutions in Japan, Vietnam in the 20th century, and during the Spanish Civil War. C. Bautista

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