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‘Believe, suffer for the Church and Christ’ −Pabillo

Manila Auxiliary Bishop Broderick Pabillo urged the faithful to strengthen their faith especially these times when the Church is often labeled as irrelevant and politically incorrect during mass for the feast of the 15 Thomasian Martyrs yesterday, Nov. 6 at the Santísimo Rosario Parish-UST.

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Photo by Nathaniel Salcedo/TomasinoWeb

Manila Auxiliary Bishop Broderick Pabillo urged the faithful to strengthen their faith especially these times when the Church is often labeled as irrelevant and politically incorrect.

 

Pabillo said that a lot of Christians are afraid to speak up most especially on pressing issues like the rampant extrajudicial killings in the country during mass for the feast of the 15 Thomasian Martyrs yesterday, Nov. 6 at the Santísimo Rosario Parish-UST.

 

“Before, people would encourage us to live the Christian values and those who live the Christian values are admired. But in the present times, if you live the Christian values, people would make fun of you and curse you,” Pabillo said.

 

Pabillo also asserted that a lot of people still believe that abortion, death penalty, and same-sex marriage are human rights.

 

“If we speak up that life is important, we are often bypassed by people. Yet, they are even trying to push that abortion is a human right,” Pabillo shared.

 

He emphasized the importance of accepting the fact that being a Christian will always have its small and big consequences and is reflected on how the 15 Thomasian martyrs offered their lives to God.

 

“We do not only have the privilege to believe, but we also have the privilege to suffer for the sake of Christ”

 

The 15 Thomasian Martyrs are students, professors, priests and administrators of the University who were killed in the religious persecutions in Japan, Vietnam in the 20th century, and during the Spanish Civil War. C. Bautista

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Success arises from moments of failure, setbacks — Ang

“Other people too have their share of misses and losses just like any human being,” the University’s rector said.

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Fr. Richard Ang O.P., the University's rector, during his homily. Screengrab from the University's Facebook page.

The University’s Rector Magnificus reminded Thomasians during the online Baccalaureate Mass on Friday, July 23, that failure is part of every success story.

Very Rev. Fr. Richard Ang O.P. said that all are meant to be successful in their careers, but one must first experience failures or setbacks to succeed.

“Other people too have their share of misses and losses just like any human being,” Ang said. 

“They were a big failure at the start, but they became a great success in the end – and it was not an overnight success,” he added.

Ang compared failure and success to both the Parable of the Sower and Thomas Edison’s discovery of the lightbulb.

In the Parable of the Sower, the seeds grew first to two soils where it either dried the plant or was choked from thorny bushes. It then later grew healthily on good soil.

“The scenes of failure are side swept by the final scene of success, which might not have come to the sower decided to stop with every obstacle along the way,” Ang said, comparing the parable with the “obstacles along the way.”

He ended the first part of his homily emphasizing that Thomasians may have threaded through a needle hole (butas ng krayom), but now they have redeemed themselves by graduating.

“Bawing-bawi kayong lahat, walang aalis ng UST nang talunan – lahat panalo,” he said.

Gratefulness and fulfillment

Ang also reminded Thomasians to not allow success enter their heads and be grateful with what they have already achieved.

“Achievement does not entitle you to get what you want,” he said.

Ang explained that when a person wants more than what he has, it is already a form of covetousness.

He said covetousness can possibly be due to pressure from family, peers, or even from benefactors.

“If we are not satisfied with what we have, we will not be satisfied with more, and with everything,” he added.

Ang said we must graciously accept what we have and not compare our harvest with other people.

“Be happy by recognizing how good things really are despite your previous failures or faults – for without those failures or faults, this moment would not come,” he said.

The Baccalaureate Mass was held online due to restrictions on mass gatherings imposed by the government.

It was streamed online on Facebook, live from the Santissimo del Rosario Parish.

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Duterte critic is new CBCP president

Bishop Pablo Virgilio David, one of President Rodrigo Duterte’s leading critics, is set to begin his two-year term on December 1.

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Duterte critic Bishop Pablo Virgilio David is the new president of the Catholic Bishops Conference of the Philippines. Photo from the Diocese of Caloocan.

Caloocan Bishop Pablo Virgilio David  was elected as president of the Catholic Bishops Conference of the Philippines (CBCP) on Thursday, July 8.

David, one of President Rodrigo Duterte’s leading critics, is set to begin his two-year term on December 1.

He will replace Davao Bishop Romullo Valles, who is said to have a kinder approach with Duterte.

David, together with former Manila Apostolic Administrator Bishop Broderick Pabillo, are the leading figures of the Church against the administration’s policies, including Duterte’s drug war. (READ: Pabillo urges the Supreme Court to junk Anti-Terror Law.)

In August 2017, David condemned the killing of 17-year-old Kian delos Santos that occurred within his diocese, which covers the cities of southern Caloocan, Malabon, and Navotas where drug war casualties are high in numbers.

Pasig Bishop Mylo Huberte Vergara, a Thomasian, is elected vice-president.

 

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Bishop Pabillo urges SC to junk ATL

“Ang demokrasya ay nabubuhay kung malakas ang opposition para maging maayos ang pagsusulong ng mga batas at pagsusulong ng paraan sa lipunan,” Bishop Broderick Pabillo said.

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One year after the controversial law was signed, Duterte critic and bishop Broderick Pabillo called on the Supreme Court to act on the petitions to junk the anti-terror law.

Duterte critic and bishop Broderick Pabillo urged the Supreme Court to take action on the petitions against Anti-Terrorism Law on Saturday, July 3.

Pabillo, former Apostolic Administrator of the Archdiocese of Manila and the current Vicar Apostolic of Taytay, Palawan, reiterated that the definition of being a terrorist is unclear and it lacks safeguards against abuse.

“Isang taon na, at di pa naaksyunan ng Supreme Court ang maraming mga petisyon, at sa loob ng isang taong ito, nakit po natin ang resulta, maraming naakusahan at napagbintangan lalo na sa red tagging na nagdadala ng extrajudicial killings,Pabillo said in a webinar hosted by University of the Philippines.

Pabillo refers to the vagueness of section 4 of the said law being pressed by petitioners to be voided, they argued that it will be easy for the government to penalize forms of dissent, and it removes safeguards from the Human Security Act of 2007. 

The bishop also urged the public to stand firm on advocating on the issues involving due process and the right to dissent.

Ang demokrasya ay nabubuhay kung malakas ang opposition para maging maayos ang pagsusulong ng mga batas at pagsusulong ng paraan sa lipunan,” he said.

Signed on July 3, 2020, the said law repeals the Human Security Act of 2007 which was also challenged during the era of its formation.

There are 37 petitions against the Anti-Terror Law filed by different organizations which await a verdict from the high court.

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