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Thomasian nurse makes history in administering first COVID-19 jab

Thomasian alumna May Parson marked the historical moment of inoculating the first Covid-19 vaccine last year.

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Photo courtesy of Jacob King/Pool via Reuters

Starting her career as a scrub nurse at the UST Hospital in 2003, Thomasian alumna May Parson marked the historical moment of inoculating the first Covid-19 vaccine last year, Dec. 8. 

The British-Filipina nurse was hailed from the batch 2000 of the College of Nursing. She later decided to work in the United Kingdom and became a clinical lecturer.

Parson vaccinated the 90-year-old Margaret Keenan at a local hospital in Coventry, United Kingdom. She works as a modern matron or the department head of the hospital’s respiratory diseases ward. 

“I’m just glad that I’m able to play a part in this historic day. The last few months have been tough for all of us working in the NHS (National Health Service), but now it feels like there is light at the end of the tunnel,” she said. 

Parson shared how happy she is to represent and prove that the Filipino community can make a difference. Thomasian values, according to her, have set her apart from her other medical workers providing help to their patients. 

“At the end of the day, the culture that we have, the values that have been instilled in us is really important, kahit ano pa trabaho mo. If your values are shining through the care that you are giving, it makes a lot of difference,” she said in an interview with the UST Nursing Journal. 

Parson also advised Thomasian nurses to always “speak their values” and to remember not to let academic hardships define them as professionals. 

“Just because you are struggling with a subject, it doesn’t define your nursing education. There are things that you are going to be strong with. Speak to your values and your compassion as Thomasian nurses will set you apart from other nurses,” she said.

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UST bags 28 awards in 9th Student PH Quill

Winning entries for TomasinoWeb are: “Immortalizing the gentle giant,” “COVIDCOMMS 2021: The Bayanihan Coverage: The Covid-19 Crisis Coverage,” “#LigtasNaBalikEskwela,” and “A lighter shade.” 

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Photo from IABC Philippines

Twenty-eight entries from the University bagged awards in the 9th Philippine Student Quill awards released on Friday, May 27.

Among the winners are: The Varsitarian, Tomasian Media Circle and Talents, Tiger Media Network, and some journalism and communication arts students. 

TomasinoWeb won four entries among the 28.

Winning entries for TomasinoWeb are: “Immortalizing the gentle giant” by Ian Patrick laqui and Joie Frances Timbas; “COVIDCOMMS 2021: The Bayanihan Coverage: The Covid-19 Crisis Coverage” by Rabin Bote, Jose Rafael Ballecer, Christine Tapawan, Tricia Soto Jardin, and Paolo Alejandrino; “#LigtasNaBalikEskwela” by Genise Danga; and “A lighter shade” by Brin Raizulli Isaac. 

The awarding ceremony, annually hosted by the Philippine Chapter of the International Association of Business Communicators, will be held virtually in July 2022. 

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UST-JRN head: Amplify each other’s fact check

Journalism and Communications students were taught the basics of fact-checking during “Fake News ‘Yan: A Webinar and Workshop on Fake News” held by the UST Journalism Society (UST-JRNSoc) and UST Communication Arts’ Student Association (CASA).

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Photo courtesy of the UST Journalism Society's Facebook page

The current political climate has overloaded fact-checking coalitions with a deluge of misinformation, which is why students are being equipped with the knowledge of how to fact-check for themselves. 

Journalism and Communications students were taught the basics of fact-checking during “Fake News ‘Yan: A Webinar and Workshop on Fake News” held by the UST Journalism Society (UST-JRNSoc) and UST Communication Arts’ Student Association (CASA) on April 2. 

The webinar focused on how to create fact-check articles and what content can be fact-checked in the first place. 

The speakers of the forum emphasized the importance of finding the necessary sources that either debunk or affirm the claim in question.

Journalism coordinator Felipe Salvosa II said it is not enough to just create fact-check pieces but to spread them as well.

“Ang maganda sa mga networks (fact-checking) na ‘to they amplify each other’s fact checks,” Salvosa said, citing fact-checking networks like Tsek.ph and #FactsFirstPH.  

For UST-JRNSoc President Marymon Reyes, she said that fact-checking is a form of social responsibility.  

“It’s not really just a matter of being smart, being intellectual, it’s a matter of social responsibility that you’re taking care of other people,” she said. 

Promoting the organization, she also said that anyone can submit fact check articles to the official Journsoc email or the UST Journalism Society’s Facebook page.

The UST-JournSoc is a member of Pintig.PH, a fact-checking network made by students in 2019 that aimed to educate voters during the 2019 midterm elections.

The webinar was held on Microsoft Teams and live-streamed on the Journalism Society’s Facebook page. 

Christine Nicole Montojo
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Parents’ perception, needs and practices affect children’s reading development—English profs

 “It is a challenge among low-income families to increase literacy rate because of the fact that they cannot prioritize buying books and other instructional materials to teach their children reading and other school-related tasks,” the researchers wrote.

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A study by Assoc. Prof. Rosalyn Mirasol and Asst. Prof. Katrina Ninfa Topacio showed that a child's reading development is affected by the priority of each family, income, access to reading materials at home, and the influence of the environment.

Children’s reading development is affected by the priority of each family, income, access to reading materials at home, and the influence of the environment, a study said.

In their research titled “Reading perceptions, needs, and practices among parents of an urban poor community in the Philippines,” Assoc. Prof. Rosalyn Mirasol and Asst. Prof. Katrina Ninfa Topacio from the Department of English found that one’s home environment influences children’s reading development, as they find schooling easier and meaningful when exposed to reading activities at home.

“Literacy-rich environment have become motivated readers posit a challenge not only the educative sector of the community but more importantly, the parents who should respond to the natural law by providing adequate support especially on education and the upbringing to their children,” the researchers wrote.

According to the study, literacy contributes to the social and economic development of a country as the success of the industries relies on education. However, most families have limited resources and budget for reading materials, making it at the bottom of their priorities despite their positive views on the importance of education and reading.

 “It is a challenge among low-income families to increase literacy rate because of the fact that they cannot prioritize buying books and other instructional materials to teach their children reading and other school-related tasks,” Mirasol and Topacio wrote.

94 of every 100 Filipinos 5 years old and over are basic literate while about 91.6 percent Filipinos 10 to 64 years old are functional literate, according to the results of the 2019 Functional Literacy, Education and Mass Media Survey (FLEMMS).

274 parents of K-1 pupils from an urban poor community in Manila, Philippines were surveyed to determine their reading perceptions, needs, and practices.

The study was published at Taylor & Francis Online on June 21, 2021.

Nicole Faye Agcaoili
Reports Writer | + posts

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