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Filipino grammar important for aspiring journalists—professor

According to Ampil, strategic grammar counters the prevalent problem of Filipino readership in the country.

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Sanggunian ng Filipino President Prof. Roberto Ampil stressed the importance of Filipino language in media practice during Pluma at Papel: Pagpapayaman ng Kamalayan ng mga Susunod na Journo ng Bayan last May 17.

Members of the press must learn proper grammar in the Filipino language in order to produce creative and effective articles, a Filipino professor said last May 17 during a webinar on the usage of Filipino language. 

Prof. Roberto Ampil, who is also the incumbent president of Sanggunian ng Filipino, emphasized the significance of Filipino subjects in honing the country’s future journalists amid the developing media practice.

“Sa pamamagitan ng mga kasanayang ito ay epektibong naipahahatid ang mga mensahe dahil sa kabatiran sa kahulugan at pagkakaayos ng mga salita sa isang pahayag at higit sa lahat ay malayang dumadaloy sa ating pagsasalita ang mga kataga at pangungusap at maliwanag na nauunawaan ng mga tagapakinig/mambabasa,” he explained.

According to Ampil, strategic grammar counters the prevalent problem of Filipino readership in the country.

“[A]lam naman natin na ang readership ng mga Pilipino, may ilan na tinatamad nang magbasa,” he said.

“[I]yon ang dapat maunawaan at ipatintindi sa mga estudyante. Kapag ganito yung ginawa mo, ‘pag nilipat mo, ito yung mangyayari,” he added, referring to the Filipino grammar structure in active and passive voices.

With the evolving Filipino language, Ampil stated that the Filipinos’ use of language in society would be ever-changing.

“Sa hinaharap, mababago ang mga tuntunin. [A]ng pangit at mali ngayon, maaaring maging masining at tama bukas,” he said.

Ampil also urged the education sector to improve their system and to further prepare students for college, especially aspiring journalism majors.

“[Kapag] ganito yung lalim ng kasanayan na itinuturo, dadalhin ng [bata] ang [mga] kasanayang ito pagtungtong niya ng kolehiyo at magagamit niya ito kapag nandun na siya mismo sa kanyang trabaho, lalo na kung ang kurso mo ay journalism,” he said.

On October 9, 2018, the Supreme Court (SC) en banc validated the Commission on Higher Education’s (CHED) Memorandum Order No. 20, series of 2013, which excluded the mandatory  integration of Filipino, Panitikan, and the Philippine Constitution as core subjects in college.

Although many groups were against their ruling, the SC pushed through with its decision,  claiming that the petitioners failed to present  “any substantial argument” about the case. 

This move from the SC allowed CHED to implement their order, which is still in effect as of writing.

“Pluma at Papel: Pagpapayaman ng Kamalayan ng mga Susunod na Journo ng Bayan” is a webinar organized by the UST Journalism Society in partnership with TomasinoWeb. The event advocated for the use of Filipino language in journalism.

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Thomasian journos bag awards in 2021 PH Journalism Research Conference

Thomasian journalism students bagged awards for their academic papers and journalistic outputs during the 2021 Philippine Journalism Research Conference (PJRC) held on May 7 and 8.

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TomasinoWeb

Thomasian journalism students bagged awards for their academic papers and journalistic outputs during the 2021 Philippine Journalism Research Conference (PJRC) held on May 7 and 8.

Three journalism seniors landed in two of the top three spots in PJRC’s academic research category. 

Carlito Topacio won first place for his paper titled, “Covering Ground Zero: How the Philippine Media Portrayed China’s Role in the Covid-19 pandemic.” 

“[C]hina has been at the forefront of the public’s consciousness during the pandemic, both for good and bad reasons. I believe that the local media has played a pivotal role in that,” Topacio told TomasinoWeb.

On the other hand, Coleen Abiog and Jayziel Budino won third place for their research on the media representation of youth activism under the Duterte administration.

“The results showed that online news headlines emphasized the bad in youth activism, representing the latter as deviants and troublemakers while overlooking the cause of their movements,” Abiog said in an interview with TomasinoWeb.

Meanwhile, third-year students Laurd Salen, Miguel Galang, and Raimee Arugay placed third in the special projects category for their article on surge in HIV cases during the pandemic.

“[T]he article raises the need for greater access to testing despite the lockdown restrictions to accurately reflect the number of new HIV cases in the Philippines,” Salen told TomasinoWeb. 

Galang also described the situation as a “silent epidemic” that needs to be addressed by several institutions such as the national government, health officials, and media. 

Other battles

For Topacio, the competition was a “moment of perseverance” despite some setbacks along the way. He shared that he was able to overcome those challenges through the support of his family and friends. 

“[I] was in a bad place mentally and at one point I even wanted to back out of the contest. Fortunately my family, professors, and blockmates all helped me find the best in myself,” he said. 

“[I] didn’t want to look back at this moment as a moment of weakness but rather a moment when I persevered,” he added. 

Budino, on the other hand, shared that creating and finishing their research study in an online setup became “mentally taxing” for her team. 

“[T]here are days where we barely function at all. […] There are days where we have our internal breakdowns. We doubted our own study multiple times before. It’s always a matter of wanting to give up and realizing that we have a responsibility to continue,” she said.

Galang said that one of the challenges they faced was to figure out how their story would grab the readers’ attention, especially during the time when the news are bombarded with Covid-19 stories. 

“[The] challenge storywise is how will we frame this story [..] [in] such a way na the reader will pay attention to this health issue na hindi siya masasapawan ng Covid-19 pandemic,” Galang said. 

Arugay and Topacio both said that preparation is important when joining competitions. Topacio stressed the need to observe and listen to how panelists ask questions. 

Budino emphasized the importance of asking for help during competitions like the PJRC.

“Don’t be afraid to ask help from other people. Carlito, Coleen, and I had each other’s backs from the moment we were told that we will submit our abstracts to PJRC. Our thesis coordinator contributed a lot as well. Her encouraging words made us happier more than winning,” she said.

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Educ ex-dean is new co-editor of Routledge gerontology journal

De Guzman will be replacing Nieli Linger from the College of New Rochelle. He will have a four-year term from May 2021 to December 2025. 

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Prof. Allan de Guzman, Ph.D

Former College of Education dean was appointed yesterday, May 4, as the new co-editor of  the Routledge-published Educational Gerontology Journal. 

Prior his appointment, Prof. Allan de Guzman, Ph.D, who leads the Educational Gerontology Research Interest Group in the UST Research Center on Social Sciences and Education, has already been serving as an international advisory board member for the journal. 

De Guzman will be replacing Nieli Linger from the College of New Rochelle. He will have a four-year term from May 2021 to December 2025. 

He already published 126 articles in various ISI-listed journals and worked as an editor, board member, and reviewer for top international journals. 

His field of research is usually on topics related to adult learning, teacher education, comparative education and educational leadership and management. He is currently handling research courses in both CTHM and UST Graduate School. 

De Guzman is currently working as a research fellow for the Southeast Asian Ministers of Education Regional Centre for Innovation Technology and he president of the Metrobank Foundation Network of Outstanding Teachers and Educators.

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Journo kickstarts community ‘meryendahan’

Instead of giving away vegetables for ingredients just like in traditional community pantries, Lora’s community meryendahan provides cooked meals. 

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Photo courtesy of journalism sophomore Alexandra Lora.

Despite the heavy workload and multiple writing commissions, second year journalism student Alexandra Lora kick-started a “community meryendahan” in her Barangay Hulo neighborhood in Mandaluyong. 

The soup kitchen style community pantry started on May 1. Instead of giving away vegetables for ingredients just like in traditional community pantries, Lora’s community meryendahan provides cooked meals. 

“I came up with this concept of community pantry because I know for a fact not everyone, especially those who are in need, has the resources or appliances to cook or prepare food. Giving them cooked and prepared food, as in kakainin nalang, I believe, will help them a lot,” she told TomasinoWeb.

Knowing the struggle of putting food on the table since the pandemic began inspired Lora to set up her pantry. 

“The number of people in Mandaluyong that I know because of the prolonged lockdowns is struggling to place food on their tables,” she said, adding that the Maginhawa initiative inspired her as well.

“The community meryendahan cooks and prepares food for Mandaleños, specifically around Barangay Hulo. The food prepared is also from a karinderya across our house, which is owned by an elderly couple who, up to now, is striving to get through every day,” she said.

To fund the pantry, Lora raised money by doing poetry, short stories, and sometimes essay proofreading commissions. 

The pantry functioned for two days. Lora said, however, that it may continue if donations would pour in. 

“I aim to keep it up longer than May 2, but for that to happen, donations would be highly appreciated. Donations both in kind and in cash will help a lot for us to continue to buy what is needed to keep cooking and serving those who are in need,” she added.

Community pantries started in April at Maginhawa Street, Quezon City by Ana Patricia Non, which eventually sprouted across different parts of the country and even abroad.

As of this writing, there are at least 350 active pantries in the country, including the community pantries set up by the UST Center for Campus Ministry along the streets of Dapitan and P. Noval.

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