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Applied Physics gets Level I Pacucoa accreditation

Philippine Association of Colleges and Universities Commission on Accreditation (Pacucoa) granted the Bachelor of Science in Applied Physics major in Instrumentation the Level I accreditation status.

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Philippine Association of Colleges and Universities Commission on Accreditation (Pacucoa) granted the Bachelor of Science in Applied Physics major in Instrumentation the Level I accreditation status.

Applied Physics is the newest program among the six straight degree programs of the College of Science.

The accreditation, which was received last May, is valid for three years, up until May 2021.

According to Pacucoa’s website, Level I accreditation status allows the program to have “full administrative deregulation and financial deregulation in terms of setting of tuition and other fees and charges.” It also gives the power to change the curriculum without the Commission on Higher Education (CHED)’s approval.

The program is also made priority during awarding of grants and financial assistance from CHED and from the Department of Education (DepEd).

Pacucoa is a private accrediting agency set to give formal recognition to an educational institution through a series of phases which tests if the academic program of the institution maintains excellent standards.

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Biology student ‘physically, emotionally abused’

A biology student last Saturday night revealed the “physical abuses,” which led to severe hematoma, allegedly done by her then-boyfriend.

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Photo grabbed from Diane Kimberly's Facebook account.

A biology student last Saturday night revealed the “physical abuses,” which led to severe hematoma, allegedly done by her then-boyfriend.

Diane Kimberly Arcena shared on Twitter how Kyle Viray, also a biology student of UST, has treated her as a “physical and emotional punching bag.”

“I was putting up a smile but I was all broken inside and [couldn’t] possibly understand how he (Viray) could do such things then act all normal and be sorry in a matter of seconds[,]” Arcena said.

The two started dating around September last year, a close friend of Arcena, who requested anonymity, confirmed to TomasinoWeb through an online interview.

Arcena’s almost-two-year college friend added that the “beatings” began in December, when Arcena was supposed to have a drink with a friend.

Viray “assumed Kim would flirt and cheat on him,” the confidant said.

In her Twitter thread, Arcena told that Viray “physically hurt” her again over an Instagram post with a message, “landi lang ganon,” while playing around with a flask. She had to “sneak out of his sight” just to inform her friends about what happened.

But, Arcena did not want them to tell her brothers that she was “beaten up.”

“She didn’t want us na magsabi sa mga kuya niya. But you can feel na natatakot siya by the way she messaged us that day,” Arcena’s companion said.

“She was scared nung una na magsumbong o maglabas ng mga nangyayari kasi baka balikan siya ni Kyle,” the source added.

Meanwhile, another biology student, who has known Viray since second year college and wished to be named anonymous, said Viray is different as a friend.

“Mabait siyang kaibigan pero sa babae talaga siya violent,” the friend told TomasinoWeb in a separate interview.

A comrade of Viray since first year college, who wanted to be unnamed as well, also claimed “they did not know much” about the incident.

“Pinaniwala niya rin kami…na wala siyang ginagawa, na si Kim may kasalanan.”

Before the alleged abuses took place, the ex-lovers have been quarreling over “petty” things, Arcena posted.

“We’d always fight over petty things. I’d always feel the need to explain myself kahit wala naman talaga akong dapat i-explain in the first place… I don’t owe him an explanation kasi I’m not even doing anything behind his back[,]” she stated in a tweet.

Viray has been reported to have “abused” Gil Morales, his girlfriend before Arcena, too.

Morales disclosed on Twitter the bruises allegedly performed by Viray.

According to the UST student handbook, “threatening or inflicting injuries, physical or otherwise, on another person, whether inside or outside the campus” is a violation of the maintenance of peace and order in the University.

The handbook states that the “imposition of appropriate disciplinary actions shall be progressive in character, taking into account the previous violations committed by the offender.” Grave offenses, meanwhile, will warrant a suspension, wherein the extent is based on the panel assigned to the case.

Social Welfare and Development Board of the College of Science purportedly penalized Viray with 250 hours of community service.

Arcena also filed a lawsuit against Viray last month for the alleged violation of Republic Act 9262 or Anti-Violence Against Women and Their Children Act of 2004.

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The measure defines violence against women as any act, which will “result in or likely result in physical, sexual, psychological harm or suffering,” done by a person against his wife, former wife, or a woman whom he has or had a sexual and dating relationship and a common child.

Violators of the act will face imprisonment, a fine of P100,000 to P300,000 and mandatory psychological counseling or psychiatric treatment.

Arcena’s friend said Kim will check for updates on the resolution of the case in the Manila City hall this week.

TomasinoWeb tried to reach some faculty members of the College of Science but they still have yet to respond as of press time.

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Faculty member elected new NAST academician

Dr. Mudjekeewis Santos of UST Graduate School was elected as an academician of the National Academy of Science and Technology (NAST).

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Photo grabbed from University of Santo Tomas' official website.

Dr. Mudjekeewis Santos of UST Graduate School was elected as an academician of the National Academy of Science and Technology (NAST).

Santos, who teaches part-time in population genetics and aquatic biotechnology, said he will use the title to develop and fulfill his advocacy.

“Being an Academician, I now have a higher level of instrument and platform, which I can use to further [develop] my scientific work and advocacy for the benefit of the fisheries and aquatic resources sector and the entire Filipino nation,” he said in an online interview with TomasinoWeb.

Santos was recognized for his contributions in fish science, fishery management and marine biodiversity in the country.

He also initiated the use of “DNA barcoding protocol in the Philippines to understand fish population structures, identify fish species and by-products for traceability and labeling purposes, and for monitoring of trade in endangered, protected, and regulated aquatic species.”

He, however, did not expect to receive the title at a “relatively young age.”

“Not in my wildest dreams especially at relatively young age! Usually, nominees that are made members are in their ‘senior years’ when their body of scientific contribution is already at its fullest,” he said.

Santos is also a member of the Graduate Tribunal Committee of the Graduate School.

According to NAST’s website, the Academician grant is given to those who have done “exemplary contributions to science and technology and have advanced its cause in the [country].”

NAST Philippines is the advisory body to the government and science community on matters related to science and technology.

“The NAST members may have seen something in me that I myself am not even aware of, which I reckon is something good,” Santos said.—H.M.A.

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Filmmakers highlight importance of storymaking in films

Veteran filmmakers on Saturday stressed the importance of storytelling in movie production amid the advances in the contemporary age.

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Photo by Alec Go/TomasinoWeb.
Photo by Alec Go/TomasinoWeb.

Veteran filmmakers on Saturday stressed the importance of storytelling in movie production amid the advances in the contemporary age.

Antoinette Jadaone, the director and scriptwriter of blockbuster-hit “That Thing Called Tadhana,” said that student filmmakers should focus more on “sincere” storytelling rather than on visuals, despite their skills and expertise on the technical aspect of filmmaking.

“Wag mag focus sa visuals, mas sa heart ng kwento, sa character. Be sincere with the films you make, it’s not always about the visuals,” Jadaone told TomasinoWeb during De La Salle University’s (DLSU) Indie Un-film Festival (IUF) Talks.

Jadaone, who was also the director of “Love You to the Stars and Back,” however, lauded students of today’s generation with their films that display stunning visuals.

“I think ngayon, sobrang ganda ng technical know-how [of films made by students]. Kasi pag nanonood ako ng student films, ang ganda na ng ilaw, ang ganda na ng production design. So may mata na sila sa kung ano ‘yung visually maganda. Ang kailangan na lang talaga i-work on ay ‘yung kung tungkol saan ‘yung pelikula at kung paano mo ilalahad ‘yung pelikula,” she stated.

Filmmaker and DLSU professor Clodualdo del Mundo Jr. echoed the never-ceasing importance of storytelling in filmmaking.

“Technology may change the way you tell your story, [it] may change because of the techniques, but the essential thing is the story that you’d tell and how they connect with the human experience,” Del Mundo Jr. told TomasinoWeb.

“Human experience was true before and it’s still true today,” he added.

He also commended the students’ initiative in learning the technical aspect in their young age.

Watching even the “bad” movies will help the students “learn about mistakes” before heading to filmmaking, the professor further advised.

Now on its 15th year, IUF is an annual event by the DLSU Green Media Group where film entries of college students are being showcased.

According to IUF Project Head Valerie Torre, they might open the competition to senior high school students as early as next year.

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