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EdTech forges partnership with Google

The UST Educational Technology Center (EdTech) partnered with tech giant Google to create Gmail accounts under the ust.edu.ph domain for school administrators, faculty members and students.

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Photo grabbed from EdTech UST’s Facebook account

The UST Educational Technology Center (EdTech) partnered with tech giant Google to create Gmail accounts under the ust.edu.ph domain for school administrators, faculty members and students.

The partnership aims to create innovative, modern, and efficient learning schemes through a number of web-based Google apps like Google Docs and Google Drive.

“Google For Education is something that would be extremely beneficial for students and faculty,” EDTECH’s Technology Infrastructure Manager, Raul Ponay told TomasinoWeb.

“We wouldn’t want to be left behind as a University in the digital age where a lot of our time is spent on the Internet, it would be practical to have a spare email account for academic activities and purposes,” Ponay said.

He added that the new email addresses would provide an alternative to the Blackboard-based eLearning Access Program (eLeAP).

“The eLeAP, which is exceptionally useful, often experiences crashes or connectivity issues whenever there’s a server maintenance or when it gets too crowded and there’s not much to do from there,” he said.

Activating the email account, which also gives users unlimited storage on Google Drive, is simple.

One must log onto Gmail using their student number with the “ust.edu.ph” domain (e.g. 1611000000@ust.edu.ph). The password is the user’s birthdate in the mmddyyyy format.

Once logged in, the user will be asked to change the password for security purposes.

“The email addresses reinforces UST’s learning system, giving the Thomasian community another option that would best suit their needs,” Ponay said.

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Mental health must be treated like physical health, advocate urges

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A mental health advocate encouraged Thomasians on Thursday to treat mental health as important as physical health.

Kenneth Aranas, vice chairperson for education and research of the Youth for Mental Health Coalition, said that mental health problems are “not just in the mind” and they should be treated like physical illnesses.

“It only takes a little bit of understanding to really understand what people with mental health problems are going through.” Aranas said. “Mental health is not bound to a certain group of people. mental health problems can affect anyone.”

Aranas also pointed out the importance of family support in battling mental health disorders.

“Your first line of defense is your family, because they’re the ones that truly understand you. And if your family is already discriminating you or stigmatizing you, because of a mental health problem, then your whole support system crumbles, if your family is not supportive of you,” he said.

He said the stigma of mental illnesses is the “biggest blocking factor” in the progress when it comes to discussion of mental health.

Moreover, he encouraged everyone to break the stigma and to advocate for Mental Health.

“Advocacy on mental health is something each and every one of you can advocate for. You don’t have to be a mental health professional to advocate mental health.”

The seminar titled “Sonder: A Mental Health Seminar” was organized by the UST Faculty of Pharmacy Student Council. — H. Amoroso

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Mental illness is not a weakness, psychiatrists say

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Psychiatrists from The Medical City discussed the matters concerning the mental health of the youth. Photo courtesy of Genelaine Urbano/TomasinoWeb.

Psychiatrists from The Medical City urged the public not to look at mental illness as a weakness because it discourages young people from seeking help.

“Hindi siya yung kahinaan ng loob. Hindi ‘yan yung ‘mawawala rin ‘yan.’ And finally, hindi ‘yan yung kahinaan ng ability niyo to cope,” said Dr. Ronaldo Elepaño III during the Youth Mental Health Caravan last Friday, Sept. 15.

In one of his presentations, he pointed out that depression is a medical condition as he compared positron emission tomography (PET) scans of a normal brain and a brain experiencing depression.

“The PET scan is a diagnostic technique where makikita mo kung active yung brain mo. The more orange [the] yellow parts of your brain you have, ibig sabihin, the more active it is…that is a normal brain. What do you notice doon sa depressed brain […] kita niyo ba yung kulay? Anong nakikita sa depressed brain — mostly blue,” Elepaño said.

Another psychiatrist also agreed that the stigma prevents students from seeking help even there are free services offered.

“There’s an element of hesitance, because at the back of your mind, you think of what other people might think — and you want to make sure that there is that confidentiality. So, we really have to raise the understanding that mental health problems are just like physical health problems. So they need the same attention and care that they deserve,” Dr. Geraldine Divino-Lobo told TomasinoWeb in an interview.

Moreover, she encouraged everyone to help young people develop positive ways of coping stress.

“Kids are going through a lot of stress right now, so there’s that difficulty in how they cope. What we need to do is to help them develop more positive coping skills,” Lobo said.

READ  Mental illness is not a weakness, psychiatrists say

“At the same time, we need to identify them, who among these students have mental health problems that require intervention. Not just helping them as colleagues or as friends, but to help them connect with the proper and necessary help that they need.”

Dr. Maria Imelda Batar, director of the hospital’s Department of Psychiatry, suggested that there should be mental health programs and policies even in workplaces.

“It (Mental Health Act of 2017) necessitates employers to raise awareness on mental health issues; correct the stigma and discrimination associated with mental health conditions; identify and provide support for individuals at risk; and facilitate access of individuals with mental health conditions to treatment and psychosocial support,” she said.

The Youth Mental Health Caravan was organized by the Central Student Council in line with Suicide Prevention Week.

by Wynona Nicole Orlina

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Nutrition graduates harvest awards in nutrition research seminar

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Recent graduates of the University’s Nutrition and Dietetics program reaped awards in the 43rd Food and Nutrition Research Seminar of the Department of Science and Technology’s Food and Nutrition Research Institute last July 3 to 5.

From left to right: Shaira Carandang, Arianne Sherie Agustin, College of Education Dean Allan de Guzman, Roniel Rose Barrientos, Gabrieleene Viray. Photo from the UST website.

Thomasian nutritionists Arianne Sherie Agustin, Roniel Rose Barrientos, Shaira Carandang, and Gabrieleene Viray bagged first place in the poster category, and second place in the oral category.

They worked on the study titled, “What predicts malnutrition among a select group of Filipino elderly in institutionalized setting? A Partial Least Square (PLS) Study”, under the supervision of the College of Education Dean Allan De Guzman.

Barrientos, who represented the group in the oral division, said that their preparation for the competition involved a routine of recap on the research study.

“We have discussed what we have done and experienced while we were making the research to refresh our minds, in line with the preparation for the Q&A portion,” she said in an online interview with TomasinoWeb.

In 2015, the BS Nutrition and Dietetics program of UST received Level IV accreditation from the Philippine Association of Colleges and Universities Commission on Accreditation, alongside three other programs of the College of Education.

ni Carisse Nicole Dumaua

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