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¡Qué horror!: Scary spots to check out in UST for paranormal junkies

Planning for your next ghost hunt? Here are some places inside UST that you might have missed.



(UPDATED  Nov. 1, 2:15 p.m.)  While every school has a ghost story of its own, a 406-year-old university like UST is certainly fertile ground for more than one ghost story.

While new tales of horror crop up every year, similar tales across generations of Thomasians have proven that certain locations in the University are hotspots for paranormal encounters.

Planning for your next ghost hunt? Look no further than UST! TomasinoWeb has rounded up both familiar places and spots that you might have missed inside the University:

Women’s restroom (St. Raymund de Peñafort Bldg., first floor)

St. Raymund’s Bldg. has its own fair share of spine-tingling stories but one of its most popular ones happen around the girls’ bathroom on the first floor. The sobs of a woman covered in blood are often heard by students, especially at night. — Danielle Baranda, Faculty of Arts and Letters

Men’s restroom (Main Bldg., first floor)

The slow hum of the exhaust fan, the eerie feeling of being watched, the rhythmic dropping of water from the faucet, and the uneasiness when one passes by the mirror have all sent a lot of chills running down the spine of every student as they enter the men’s restroom. — Jezreel Dave Colorge, Faculty of Pharmacy

Botanical Garden

During the day, it is an inviting escape from the heat and even solace, but as the night falls, the stillness of the pitch black surroundings and its murky atmosphere, adds to the eerie vibe of this particular place inside the University. With its thick flora, an unshakable feeling of being watched is often felt by anyone frequenting here. — Danielle Arcegono, Faculty of Arts and Letters

Villamor Drive

You are being watched — the eerie vibe emanating from the dark alleyway behind St. Martin de Porres Bldg. never fails to send shivers down the spine of anyone who dares walk down the path at night, especially in considering the fact that Villamor Drive runs just behind the infamous hallway of preserved organs inside St. Martin de Porres. — Cielo Erikah Mae Cinco, Faculty of Arts and Letters

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Got other places in mind? Comment below or tweet us at @TomasinoWeb and share with us your own set of horror spots inside UST!

Photos by Darryl Lance Limpin, Mark Darius Sulit, Elizabeth Nicole Regudo, and Abbie Vinluan

Post-processing by Elizabeth Nicole Regudo and Genelaine Urbano



Film Fridays: Enjoying films underneath the stars

Sometimes, a chill Friday after an exhausting week is all we need—a rest for the mind and feast for the eyes.



Photo by Elizabeth Nicole Regudo/TomasinoWeb.

It was Friday… again.

It was the day where all responsibilities were crammed within the 24-hour period, with only caffeine and the thought of “weekend” to survive.

But it was not just any ordinary Friday.

Lounging at a grassy field underneath the starry night while watching good films, Thomasian Film Society’s Film Fridays gave me life.

Snacks were given to the first 150 participants and also you’d get to watch spectacular films under the night sky. Sitting on the grass, side by side with your friends or even your significant other—well, in my case, only just a bag of popcorn in my hand while The Blanks performed covers as well as their original songs.

We all know that the company of good food and good music could always make us feel better, right?

Sineng Sine Films like Bilang, Bakokang and Larawan were featured during the first Friday of the event. These three managed to make the viewers hold their tears as the audience was moved with each of the film’s stories. A plot involving death, betrayal, and lies within a family would always make everyone shift in their seats.

After the film showing, award-winning directors Nerisa Picadizo, Jaynus Olaivar and Marvin Cabangunay shared their experiences on filmmaking where their stories inspired the aspiring filmmakers.

“Go out there and do it!” Picadizo exclaimed. Her voice was filled with so much enthusiasm that everyone can’t help feeling the same way.

Well, have I mentioned that this was not a one-night thing? After the first day, everyone was ecstatic as the 2nd of March came knocking on our doors as Mikhail Red, the director of internationally-recognized and award-winning film Birdshot, came to town.

The director gave us the opportunity to look upon his journey as a filmmaker and shared to us the hell he—together with his crew—went through before, during and after every film.

Starting at a very young age, he started filmmaking at 15 years old and after a decade he’s still doing the very first thing he fell in love with—creating unique films with a touch of Western flavor.

Listening to his story wasn’t the only thing he prepared for the attendees of Film Fridays. He even generously shared to us the trailers for his films like Rekorder and Neomanila—and it didn’t stop there! Aside from sharing a secret with us (which you’ll never know until before the end of the year, he also teased us with his new film in the works, Eerie, a “not your typical Filipino horror film” as well as his future projects.

But with all the upcoming short films, wouldn’t you feel restless, too? Despite that, I know all of these were worth waiting for.


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The fate of Maria Clara and women empowerment

We are asked to be Maria Clara. Women are asked to act demurely and be meek, and when she acts not in the character of Maria Clara, she will always be reprimanded with the words: “Kababae mong tao”.



Art by Baron Balaba/TomasinoWeb.

He called me pretty.

Sexy, beautiful or maybe even asked me to smile. I do not recall exactly what words those were. I did not take the time and pause to hear what he said, nor look at his face. But today, a man I did not know called me pretty.

My mother always reminded me to wear decent clothing and by decent, meaning clothes that do not reveal too much of my body. I do not blame her. Most mothers remind their daughters to do the same for their protection, specifically protection from our misogynistic society. She’d always say: “Wag mo sila bigyan ng rason para bastusin ka.”  I followed my mother’s advice; I dressed up as decent I can be and yet, even when I’m wearing my school uniform, strangers would catcall me in the streets.

It isn’t always just in the streets where I feel uncomfortable about my body. It also happens at family gatherings, when my relatives would joke about my weight. I am not a size 2 nor do I have a supermodel figure. I am a size 8 and I have a thick body frame, in which I have no problem with. But when the jokes about my weight are brought up, it makes me feel invalidated, that there is something wrong with me: “Uy, ang taba mo na!”, “Parang kailangan na natin magdiet ah”, “Gusto mo mag gym?” and the worst one yet, “Nako, walang manliligaw sayo pag ganyan katawan mo”. Again, I don’t blame my relatives; it is just something that we Filipinos are used to. Society has taught us to keep a figure that is slender, and not be fat or obese because to be fat or obese means there is something wrong with you and if you’re a woman, you are not appealing to a man as if your whole future depends on finding a man to marry.

But more than just the clothes every woman like me is asked to wear or our bodies, there is a social order in which each gender is assigned to follow. For women, specifically in the Philippines, we are asked to be Maria Clara. Women are asked to act demurely and be meek, and when she acts not in the character of Maria Clara, she will always be reprimanded with the words: “Kababae mong tao”.

Society has confined women in this social order: To follow, to be controlled and be quiet.

In comparison with the men in society, they are not asked to wear “decent” clothing for them to be respected, nor is their weight not a huge issue. Moreover, they are not asked to be quiet or to be meek, and there will always be an excuse for their actions, good or bad: “Boys will be boys”. Though there is still a social order that men follow, that they are not allowed to be soft or feminine, but it is not as suppressing as for women.

It is undeniable that our society is patriarchal. Men are believed to be more superior to women, making them secondary. The Philippines being a Catholic country, our beliefs are mostly based on the Catholic bible. According to St. Paul, women must become subjects to their husbands, which doesn’t mean entirely bad but implies women must follow their husbands as they are the head of the family. It isn’t only in religion women are seen as secondary to men. A lot of films, commercials and print ads revolve around narratives in which women are seen as subjects for the male gaze. One of which is the advertisement for beer, a woman is usually present, in which has no connection with the bottle of beer, but to give emphasis on the man’s masculinity.

This idea validates the power of men over women. The things we see on TV, the internet, films and so much more, that show women as secondary to men contributes to the still on-going misogyny present in our society.

Though times have been changing, and a lot of women fought for the discrimination that has been happening for the past years, it is uneasy to say patriarchy is still here. That is why a lot of people still fight against it, may it be in the streets or online. Social media has been a great avenue for voicing out ideas and opinions. It is also an avenue for reaching out to people and inform people of what is happening outside the online world. One of which is the recent #MeToo movement, wherein women shared their stories of being harassed and abused by men in particular.

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Social media has been a place where women empowerment is well talked about. A lot of posts and tweets that say, they are for women and believe women should be respected, and it gets a lot of shares and retweets, in which is a good thing as it could inform more people about women empowerment. But there are also tweets and posts that are women positive but the empowerment only lives in the post or tweet alone. I know a lot of people who tweet or post such things but when outside the online world, they do not stay true to their words. Moreover, there are also people who post and tweet that they support women but in fact they only support themselves or are only for women when it’s convenient. And lastly, there are also people who say that they empower women, when in fact they only empower women who are privileged.

I am not saying that those women whom I call privileged do not feel discrimination or harassment, nor see them as shallow. It is safe to say that I am one of those women, and many of my women friends are also privileged. There is nothing wrong with empowering ourselves. But then again, when we say women empowerment, it must include all women. What about the women at the lowest of the lowest? Who empowers them?

It is easy to say that you empower women by posting a tweet with hashtags such as #MeToo or #TimesUp, but women empowerment is more than that. It is more than sharing your own “I was catcalled” story, or your body positivity story. There are women who are constantly abused by their husbands but do not say anything out of fear. There are also marginalized women at the bottom of the bottom who are sold for sex, even girls as young as the age of seven who are abducted for slavery. There are young women who are unable to access education because they cannot afford it, and women in poverty who are hungry due to the unequal access to employment, resources and social services because women are seen to be weak. Who speaks for them?

Again, I am not saying that street harassment and catcalling, body negativity or the “kababae mong tao” problems are shallow. They are also problems that should be addressed. Because when we let these little things happen, we allow bigger things to follow. Those little things are what lead us to suppressing women as weak and subjects to be controlled by misogyny. When we teach society that we, women, should be quiet and be Maria Clara, we teach them to be silent and eventually not to speak for themselves. Maria Clara obeyed his father and all the men around her. Her decisions were made by the men around her, and in the end she ended up raped by Padre Salvi and she kept silent about it because she was taught that the ideal woman should be quiet.

Women empowerment is more than posting or tweeting that you are one with women, or wearing an H&M shirt that says “The Future is Female”, there is nothing wrong with it but it must not stop there. Women empowerment is about speaking for those who cannot speak for themselves, which includes all women in all classes. It is speaking for those Maria Claras who remain silent about their suffering. It is for all women, not just for those who are convenient to empower.

In all honesty, I too question myself and what have I done for women. But I am still learning on what can I do and how can I empower them. Eventually, I hope that I, and everyone else, can contribute in empowering all women, so that in time no woman will be ever called pretty by a strange man in the streets.


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What’s up with the IV of Spades fever?

The retro-inspired band only has four singles to date. What’s with all the hype?



Photo courtesy of Daniel Joseph Aguilar.

The local music scene is becoming an interesting place again—and it’s all thanks to the internet. Without the middle men and major record labels standing in the way, the recent years saw young and fresh acts getting the spotlight even with experimental or otherwise non-mainstream efforts. It’s not everyday that the Filipino audience gets to see an R&B-inspired music video, a straight-up folk creation, or a complete ’70s throwback.

With all these new bands cropping up, what’s with all the hype with IV of Spades? They only have four singles to date, but IV of Spades is already making a lot of noise in the local music scene with their constant live shows and uniformly retro-inspired (or is it tito-inspired?) aesthetic.

The internet has already caught the quartet’s fever—and it seems that it’s not going anywhere soon.

IV of Spades has been around since 2014, but their current funk rebrand stuck with listeners and viewers. With vocalist and guitarist Unique Salonga, bassist Zild Benitez, drummer Badjao de Castro, and lead guitarist Blaster Salonga, IV of Spades’s music initially gained a reputation for its pop hooks, fun and upbeat instrumentation, catchy-as-hell melody and their trademark vintage aesthetic that they meticulously carry in their music videos and live performances.

Their disco-heavy references, from their sound to song titles and outfits often draw comparisons to acts like VST & Co., Hotdog, and Apo Hiking Society—and surely, listening to their songs, from the suave Ilaw Sa Daan to the irresistible groove of Where Have You Been, My Disco?, feels like a trip down the memory lane.

Their songs mix a variety of genres such as funk, disco, soul and that nostalgic Manila Sound vibe for music that will surely make you dance, and it’s a genuinely fitting tribute to those eras.

Unlike other local independent bands, IV of Spades’s fans are very notorious and vocal in promoting the band as they continuously tweet and post about the band through memes and lyrical snippets almost on a daily basis, making sure that everyone knows who IV of Spades is and why people should give them a shot on their Spotify playlist.

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It’s annoying at times, but the clamor of their fans only goes to show that their popularity is undeniable.

Despite their still-young discography, IV of Spades is already on their way to greater heights: Their single Mundo debuted at No. 1 on Spotify’s Global and Philippines Viral 50 charts, not to mention that they started 2018 with a blast when they won AirAsia’s Dream Come True contest for the most promising act in Southeast Asia, beating out 19 other acts in the region for the top spot.

IV of Spades is surely going to get more attention as they put out more music (and hopefully, an EP or an album) in the months to come, and with all the gigs and hype the band is getting, it seems like the quarter’s feverish groove is just getting started.


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